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apprehension

used in a sentence
3 meanings
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1  —as in:
apprehension about finals
Definition worry about what is to come
  • She looked around the examination room with apprehension.
apprehension = concern about what will happen
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • She looked forward to meeting his parents, but not without apprehension.
  • apprehension = nervousness
  • She had heard first a bustling in the front of the jail, and smelled fresh coffee, and had sat up, stiff with apprehension.
    Natalie Babbitt  --  Tuck Everlasting
  • apprehension = concern about what will happen
  • How could he be so oblivious to my apprehension?
    Khaled Hosseini  --  The Kite Runner
  • apprehension = worry
  • Ladies in bunches always filled me with vague apprehension and a firm desire to be elsewhere,
    Harper Lee  --  To Kill a Mockingbird
  • apprehension = worry
  • Fanny was all agitation and flutter; all hope and apprehension.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • apprehension = worry
  • I had a horrible sinking in my heart, and from Van Helsing's face I gathered that he felt some fear or apprehension as to what was to come.
    Bram Stoker  --  Dracula
  • apprehension = worry
  • The happy mood of the afternoon was rapidly dissolving in apprehension.
    Elizabeth George Speare  --  The Witch of Blackbird Pond
  • apprehension = worry
  • Calvin touched Meg in a quick gesture, and whether it was of thanks or apprehension she was not sure.
    Madeleine L'Engle  --  A Wrinkle in Time
  • apprehension = nervousness
  • Yet these thoughts affected Hester Prynne less with hope than apprehension.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  The Scarlet Letter
apprehension = worry

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —as in:
apprehension of the criminal
Definition the capture of a criminal
  • The tip led to the criminal's apprehension in Mexico.
apprehension = capture
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • So far, she has evaded apprehension, but it's just a matter of time.
  • apprehension = capture
  • Finally, in March 1952, just before the treaty took effect and the occupation ended, the order for apprehension of fugitive war criminals was lifted.
    Laura Hillenbrand  --  Unbroken
  • apprehension = capture and arrest
  • Nor did my hate long confine itself to useless wishes; I began to reflect on the best means of securing him; and for this purpose, about a month after my release, I repaired to a criminal judge in the town and told him that I had an accusation to make, that I knew the destroyer of my family, and that I required him to exert his whole authority for the apprehension of the murderer.
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
  • apprehension = capture
  • One must also bear in mind the strange coincidence that what is argued to be a wrong identification led to the apprehension of an associate who immediately confessed.
    Alan Paton  --  Cry, the Beloved Country
  • apprehension = the capture (typically of a criminal)
  • The arrest order for suspected war criminals had been lifted. ... The lifting of the apprehension order was the result of an unlikely turn in history.
    Laura Hillenbrand  --  Unbroken
  • apprehension = capture and arrest
  • If he had tugs of conscience over what he'd done, he shrugged them away by assuring himself that the lifting of the fugitive-apprehension order was a personal exoneration.
    Laura Hillenbrand  --  Unbroken
apprehension = capture and arrest

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
3  —as in:
apprehension of the situation
Definition to understand

or:

in psychology and philosophy:  immediate awareness prior to analysis and judgment
  • Nat Turner was said to have "natural intelligence and quickness of apprehension, surpassed by few."
apprehension = understanding
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • I was startled and thrilled with my apprehension of the painting.
  • apprehension = understanding
  • What a piece of work is a man! How noble in reason, how infinite in faculty! In form and moving how express and admirable! In action how like an angel, in apprehension how like a god!
    R.J. Palacio  --  Wonder
  • apprehension = understanding
  • On every point of general literature he displays unbounded knowledge and a quick and piercing apprehension.
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
  • apprehension = understanding
  • He knew her to be clever, to have a quick apprehension as well as good sense, and a fondness for reading, which, properly directed, must be an education in itself.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • apprehension = understanding
  • In a thousand ways he smoothed for me the path of knowledge and made the most abstruse inquiries clear and facile to my apprehension.
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
  • apprehension = understanding
  • Those of his successors in each branch of natural philosophy with whom I was acquainted appeared even to my boy's apprehensions as tyros engaged in the same pursuit.
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
  • apprehensions = understandings
  • I was ready to sink from fatigue and hunger, but being surrounded by a crowd, I thought it politic to rouse all my strength, that no physical debility might be construed into apprehension or conscious guilt.
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
  • apprehension = understanding
  • She could only perceive that it must relate to Wimpole Street and Mr. Crawford, and only conjecture that something very imprudent had just occurred in that quarter to draw the notice of the world, and to excite her jealousy, in Miss Crawford's apprehension, if she heard it.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • apprehension = understanding
  • Lady Bertram could think nothing less, and Fanny shared her aunt's security, till she received a few lines from Edmund, written purposely to give her a clearer idea of his brother's situation, and acquaint her with the apprehensions which he and his father had imbibed from the physician with respect to some strong hectic symptoms, which seemed to seize the frame on the departure of the fever.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
apprehensions = understandings

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®Wikipedia Article
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