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domesticated

used in a sentence
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Definition to make fit for service to humans or home life — by breeding or taming
  • Dogs were domesticated thousands of years ago.
domesticated = made fit for service to humans or home life — by breeding or taming
  • domesticated plants like maize
  • Wolves are not domesticated. Even if they are raised in the home, they are not suitable pets like dogs.
  • The disquietude he felt on Katahdin's granite heights inspired some of his most powerful writing and profoundly colored the way he thought thereafter about the earth in its coarse, undomesticated state.
    Jon Krakauer  --  Into the Wild
  • undomesticated = not made fit for service to humans
    (Editor's note:  The prefix "un-" in undomesticated means not and reverses the meaning of domesticated. This is the same pattern you see in words like unhappy, unknown, and unlucky.)
  • Zoologists will tell you that certain animals more or less "chose" domestication.
    Michael Pollan  --  The Omnivore's Dilemma
  • domestication = being made fit for service to humans
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • A domesticated rapist, obviously, an expert on the woman question.
    Ralph Ellison  --  Invisible Man
  • This was one of the results of his domestication in Washington Square.
    Henry James  --  Washington Square
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • I saw immediately that the trail had led to one of the few free motile isles which the Templars had saved from Hegemony domestication.
    Dan Simmons  --  Hyperion
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Contrary to yet another myth, Eskimo dogs are not semi-domesticated wolves though both species may well have sprung from the same ancestry.
    Farley Mowat  --  Never Cry Wolf
  • Habitations, fences, domesticated animals, men, women, children, and the soil that bore them—all worn out.
    Charles Dickens  --  A Tale of Two Cities
  • When it reached the house it domesticated itself at once, and became immediately a great favorite with my wife.
    Edgar Allan Poe  --  The Black Cat
  • These are essential traits of the wolf and the wild-dog when they have become domesticated, and these traits White Fang possessed in unusual measure.
    Jack London  --  White Fang
  • The domesticated wilderness of pine, maple and oak rolled to a halt and stuck in the frame of the train window like a bad picture.
    Sylvia Plath  --  The Bell Jar
  • I suppose I didn't expect you to have something quite so... domesticated.
    Nora Roberts  --  Summer Pleasures
  • Then after millennia beyond thinking they domesticated some animals so that they lived with their food supply.
    John Steinbeck  --  Travels with Charley
  • It was originally domesticated by the Mayans.
    Margaret Atwood  --  Cat's Eye
  • But we could easily breed slower, more domesticated dinosaurs.
    Michael Crichton  --  Jurassic Park
  • He's standing with two armfuls of groceries, looking very domesticated.
    Colleen Hoover  --  Hopeless
  • The elephant, which its owner had reared, not for a beast of burden, but for warlike purposes, was half domesticated.
    Jules Verne  --  Around the World in 80 Days
  • And a well-paid, domesticated army was good for trade.
    V.S. Naipaul  --  A Bend in the River

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