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radioactivity

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Definition the emission of a stream of particles in nuclear decay
  • The half-life of highly radioactive substances is shorter than that of substances that radiate weakly.
(editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • For a while, people worried that the radioactive cloud could spread to Shogahama — or beyond.
    Lauren Tarshis  --  I Survived: The Japanese Tsunami, 2011
  • radioactive = coming from particles from nuclear decay
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • Radioactive particles were leaking out of the power plant.
    Lauren Tarshis  --  I Survived: The Japanese Tsunami, 2011
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • At night the ruined city gave off a radioactive glow which could be seen for miles.
    Ray Bradbury  --  The Martian Chronicles
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • The sarcophagus was glowing like something radioactive, heading for meltdown.
    Rick Riordan  --  The Red Pyramid
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • Do you know how many tons of radioactive crap will move through Carson City?
    Ellen Hopkins  --  Burned
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • It's a heavy gas, it says, radioactive, dangerous to your lungs.
    Amy Tan  --  The Bonesetter's Daughter
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • No radioactivity, no mess.
    Orson Scott Card  --  Ender's Game
  • If she seemed distant before, she now seemed to view him as radioactive.
    Nicholas Sparks  --  True Believer
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • Stains streaked across its dull surface—a grimy window to something that looked like radioactive sludge, glowing and dangerous.
    James Dashner  --  The Scorch Trials
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • Oh, finally, that radioactive mac and cheese.
    Jodi Picoult  --  Nineteen Minutes
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • He would later be told that it was the metal in his fillings resonating with the radioactivity of the bomb.
    Laura Hillenbrand  --  Unbroken
  • We were practically radioactive.
    Kami Garcia & Margaret Stohl  --  Beautiful Creatures
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • His face under the orange spray tan was red, giving him a radioactive palette.
    Gillian Flynn  --  Gone Girl
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • Particle accelerators sear the land, and leave radioactive byproducts.
    Michael Crichton  --  Jurassic Park
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • Without our intervention, the Earth today would be a radioactive wilderness.
    Arthur C. Clarke  --  Childhood's End
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • "What if someone were to blow it up, maybe release the radioactivity, if there's any left in there?"
    David Baldacci  --  Zero Day
  • He infused the radioactive tagging substance, a magnesium isotope, into the monkey and calibrated the scanner.
    Michael Crichton  --  The Andromeda Strain
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • She lifted the pages as if she were handling a tray of radioactive material.
    Pat Conroy  --  The Water is Wide
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • I heard new vocabulary: nuclear bomb, radioactive fallout, bomb shelter.
    Julia Alvarez  --  How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents
(editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)

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