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graft

used in a sentence
2 meanings
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1  —as in:
skin graft
Definition to artificially join two things; or the smaller of the items joined; or the location of the joining
  • Graft the cherry tree branch onto the plum tree.
graft = to artificially join two things; or the smaller of the items joined; or the location of the joining
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • Skin from the leg was grafted to the face of the burn victim.
  • Over the years many of us have grafted branches from our favorite trees to the trunk.
    Neal Shusterman  --  Unwind
  • grafted = artificially joined (so they grow naturally on the different trunk)
  • "One graft should do it, but we can't operate until the tissue heals," he said to the intern, then spoke to the patient.
    Ellen Raskin  --  The Westing Game
  • graft = medical transplant of living tissue
  • Your shoulder will feel a bit sore until the graft is completely healed.
    Neal Shusterman  --  Unwind
  • graft = artificial join
  • That is, before a new one is grafted on.
    Neal Shusterman  --  Unwind
  • grafted = artificially joined
  • I wished I could perform a skin graft on Tinkerbell, but that would have meant cutting her into pieces.
    Jeannette Walls  --  The Glass Castle
  • graft = artificially joining two things
  • The trucker rolls up his sleeve to reveal that the arm, which had done the tricks, had been grafted on at the elbow.
    Neal Shusterman  --  Unwind
  • grafted = artificially joined
  • They said it was called a skin graft.
    Jeannette Walls  --  The Glass Castle
  • graft = artificially joining two things
  • I explained that I had gotten it when I was three, and that I'd been in the hospital for six weeks getting skin grafts, and that was why I never wore a bikini.
    Jeannette Walls  --  The Glass Castle
grafts = artificially joining two things

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®Wikipedia Article
2  —as in:
graft and corruption
Definition corruption in which one uses their position to gain personal advantage — especially political corruption
  • The government of that country is known for graft at all levels.
graft = corruption in which one uses their position to gain personal advantage — especially political corruption
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • He was an enormously rich man—he had a hand in all the big graft in the neighborhood.
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • graft = corruption in which one uses their position to get money or other personal advantage
  • It collected the stories of graft and misery from the daily press, and made a little pungent paragraphs out of them.
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • Early in April the city elections were due, and that meant prosperity for all the powers of graft.
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • For the criminal graft was one in which the businessmen had no direct part—it was what is called a "side line," carried by the police.
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • And this army of graft had, of course, to be maintained the year round.
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • They were common enough, he said, such cases of petty graft.
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • As no one makes any profit by the sale, there is no longer any stimulus to extravagance, and no misrepresentation; no cheating, no adulteration or imitation, no bribery or 'grafting.'
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • The city, which was owned by an oligarchy of businessmen, being nominally ruled by the people, a huge army of graft was necessary for the purpose of effecting the transfer of power.
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • Tommy Hinds had begun life as a blacksmith's helper, and had run away to join the Union army, where he had made his first acquaintance with "graft," in the shape of rotten muskets and shoddy blankets.
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
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