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vocabulary
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disinclined

used in a sentence
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Definition feeling reluctant to do something
  • She is disinclined to spend money while she is still in debt.
disinclined = reluctant
  • I'm disinclined to believe him.
  • disinclined = reluctant
  • Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so.
    Douglas Adams
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • I pay very little regard...to what any young person says on the subject of marriage. If they profess a disinclination for it, I only set it down that they have not yet seen the right person.
    Jane Austen
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • "I pay very little regard," said Mrs. Grant, "to what any young person says on the subject of marriage. If they profess a disinclination for it, I only set it down that they have not yet seen the right person."
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • disinclination = reluctance (to do something)
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Sir Thomas, drawing back from intimacies in general, was particularly disinclined, at this time, for any engagements but in one quarter.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • disinclined = reluctant
  • Dr. Grant laughingly congratulated Miss Crawford on feeling no disinclination to the state herself.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • disinclination = reluctance (to do something)
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • There was no natural disinclination to be overcome, and I see no reason why a man should make a worse clergyman for knowing that he will have a competence early in life.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • disinclination = reluctance
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • But at other times doubt and alarm intermingled with his hopes; and when he thought of her acknowledged disinclination for privacy and retirement, her decided preference of a London life, what could he expect but a determined rejection? unless it were an acceptance even more to be deprecated, demanding such sacrifices of situation and employment on his side as conscience must forbid.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • disinclination = attitude of mind that does not favor
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Fanny was very anxious to be useful, and not to appear above her home, or in any way disqualified or disinclined, by her foreign education, from contributing her help to its comforts, and therefore set about working for Sam immediately; and by working early and late, with perseverance and great despatch, did so much that the boy was shipped off at last, with more than half his linen ready.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • disinclined = reluctant
  • The terrible disasters at the Ealing and South Kensington laboratories have disinclined analysts for further investigations upon the latter.
    H.G. Wells  --  The War of the Worlds
  • He had silver hair and blue eyes and was chivalrous but disinclined to talk.
    Alice Sebold  --  Lucky
  • White Fang was disinclined to desert him.
    Jack London  --  White Fang
  • Mr. Heathcliff, who grew more and more disinclined to society, had almost banished Earnshaw from his apartment.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • A short struggle ensued, though both were disinclined to violence.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Pathfinder
  • Lady Steyne, after the music scene, succumbed before Becky, and perhaps was not disinclined to her.
    William Makepeace Thackeray  --  Vanity Fair
  • It was another reason I was disinclined to stay.
    Abraham Verghese  --  Cutting for Stone
  • To Jane's surprise Lassiter showed disinclination for further talk about his trip.
    Zane Grey  --  Riders of the Purple Sage
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • They have a great disinclination to touch any object, and carefully blow the dust from it first.
    Charles Dickens  --  Bleak House
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Gringoire himself was not disinclined to regard this as altogether alarming and probable.
    Victor Hugo  --  The Hunchback of Notre Dame

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