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vocabulary
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emasculate

used in a sentence
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Definition to take away strength or vigor of someone or something

or:

to make a male less masculine

or:

to remove the testicles of a male animal
  • The Senate emasculated the law.
  • He felt emasculated by his mother.
  • Emasculated by dams and diversion canals, the lower Colorado burbles indolently from reservoir to reservoir through some of the hottest, starkest country on the continent.
    Jon Krakauer  --  Into the Wild
  • emasculated = with strength or vigor removed
  • Polished and sanguine, he looked emasculated and alien to the place where I had spent the last seven years of my life.
    Abraham Verghese  --  Cutting for Stone
  • The French Socialist and Communist literature was thus completely emasculated.
    Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels  --  The Communist Manifesto
  • But I've got to think up something or they'll emasculate the whole Department.
    Sinclair Lewis  --  Arrowsmith
  • In private he showed elation over the maddening events of the hostage crisis, clearly gleeful that America was emasculated before the world.
    Betty Mahmoody  --  Not Without My Daughter
  • The poets were pale emasculates, and Western men held them in contempt.
    John Steinbeck  --  East of Eden
  • It's chambers still contained the emasculated cartridges.
    Alfred Bester  --  The Demolished Man
  • This kind of emasculation was suffered, in one form or another, by all the men interned at Manzanar.
    Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston & James D. Houston  --  Farewell to Manzanar
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • I pictured my father finding the very act of shopping emasculating.
    Gillian Flynn  --  Gone Girl
  • Bud: He's going to state his position on that emasculation business that's stirred up such a mess in the state.
    Tennessee Williams  --  A Streetcar Named Desire
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • He trusted us to do the right thing, and here we were secretly plotting to emasculate him.
    John Grogan  --  Marley & Me
  • It's emasculating to be plucked up like a stray sock and carried about all the time.
    Henry H. Neff  --  The Maelstrom
  • Hundreds of sculptures had been emasculated.
    Dan Brown  --  Angels & Demons
  • It was an emasculation, a sentence, and this—what he was feeling now—this torture was his punishment for breaking her ridiculous vase.
    Ian McEwan  --  Atonement
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • His face had grown wrinkled, yellow, and strangely emasculate.
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky  --  The Brothers Karamazov
  • She got an emasculated carrot, a droopy leaf of celery, a soft tomato and a fresh sprig of parsley.
    Betty Smith  --  A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
  • On a beach, they made a spectacle of themselves when Fred, feeling emasculated by the pity over his missing leg, flung away his crutches, hopped over to Louie, and tackled him.
    Laura Hillenbrand  --  Unbroken
  • He'd had enough lectures on naval history to know that submarines had twice nearly strangled England's maritime empire and had successfully emasculated the economy of Japan.
    Tom Clancy  --  The Hunt for Red October

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