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dejected

used in a sentence
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Definition sad and depressed (seemingly without hope)
  • She is dejected but trying to look cheerful.
dejected = sad and depressed
  • She is feeling dejected, but I think her world will look better after a good night's sleep.
  • dejected = sad and depressed
  • "I don't have any money left," I said to her dejectedly.
    Nicholas Sparks  --  A Walk to Remember
  • dejectedly = with low spirits
  • Lennie sat down on the ground and hung his head dejectedly.
    John Steinbeck  --  Of Mice and Men
  • dejectedly = with low spirits (sadness, disappointment, hopelessness)
  • "I guess I do think about it occasionally," The Giver said. "I think about my own release when I'm in an awful lot of pain. I wish I could put in a request for it, sometimes. But I'm not permitted to do that until the new Receiver is trained."
    "Me," Jonas said in a dejected voice. He was not looking forward to the end of the training, when he would become the new Receiver.
    Lois Lowry  --  The Giver
  • dejected = sad and depressed (seemingly without hope)
  • "That ship hated me," he said dejectedly, indicating the policecraft.
    Douglas Adams  --  The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
  • "Wait you here, Sarpent," said Deerslayer as he followed in the footsteps of the dejected beauty, while passing his friend.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Deerslayer
  • "Don't let me disturb you," he went on, looking at her dejected pillar.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volume 1
  • Well, I am your theme; you have the start of me; I am dejected; I am not able to answer the Welsh flannel.
    William Shakespeare  --  The Merry Wives of Windsor
  • They elected Winslow to tell me this, and he stood in front of me with puppy dog eyes relaying the collective dejection of the group.
    Kiera Cass  --  The Heir
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • I went to the Saturday-night parties hoping she might make an appearance and went home dejected because she didn't.
    Russell Baker  --  Growing Up
  • As Ahab now glided from the dejected Delight, the strange life-buoy hanging at the Pequod's stern came into conspicuous relief.
    Herman Melville  --  Moby Dick
  • Then he allowed his arm to sink slowly, and gazed at the pavement in profound dejection.
    Victor Hugo  --  The Hunchback of Notre Dame
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • His face wore a look of dejection and despair.
    Sampon Davis, et. al.  --  We Beat the Street
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • The latter, he was informed, was very feeble, and in a state of deep dejection.
    Lew Wallace  --  Ben Hur
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • They sat dejected on the ground with compressed lips and downcast eyes, listening to their comrade below.
    Joseph Conrad  --  Lord Jim
  • They were dejected by their play, wounded by their coach's comments, unsure of what to do next.
    Warren St. John  --  Outcasts United
  • The little one, not more than four or five, was on his knees, his hands folded, and his close-clipped, bare head drooping forward in deep dejection.
    Willa Cather  --  My Antonia
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • In the mingled light and gloom of an adjacent park, a handful of wet wanderers, in attitudes of chronic dejection, was scattered among the benches.
    Stephen Crane  --  Maggie: A Girl of the Streets
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • In the palm was a seated woman in a posture of dejection—was the model the Staff Probationer?
    Abraham Verghese  --  Cutting for Stone
(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)

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