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reconcile

used in a sentence
2 meanings
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1  —as in:
reconciled their differences
Definition to bring into agreement
The exact meaning of reconcile can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "We reconciled our differences and are on friendly terms now." — settled or found a way to accept
  • "They did break up, but they reconciled since then." — made up
  • "I need to reconcile my goals with my abilities." — make compatible
  • "I need to reconcile my checkbook." — get the checkbook numbers and the bank statement to agree
  • She reconciled her checking account statement.
reconciled = brought into agreement (in this case, the statement from the bank with the record she kept in her check register)
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • His job includes reconciling all accounts.
  • reconciling = assuring agreement between
  • Let us hope still for something that will bring reconciliation.
    J.R.R. Tolkien  --  The Hobbit
  • reconciliation = reaching agreement (making up instead of fighting)
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • It was a moment of reconciliation, when the nagging hunger in his belly was forgotten and his earlier affection for her had temporarily revived.
    George Orwell  --  1984
  • reconciliation = when they were getting along well
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • In keeping with the American effort to reconcile with Japan, all of them, including those serving life sentences, would soon be paroled.
    Laura Hillenbrand  --  Unbroken
  • reconcile = coming together with good will after previous ill will
  • He was supposed to seal the peace deal with a speech calling for reconciliation and an end to violence.
    Malala Yousafzai  --  I Am Malala
  • reconciliation = making up (after a disagreement)
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • I couldn't reconcile his world with mine so I separated them.
    Tara Westover  --  Educated
  • reconcile = make compatible
  • They just had a flaming row about it and have entered the "oh, my sweet Putti" and "darling Kerli" stage of reconciliation.
    Anne Frank  --  The Diary of a Young Girl
  • reconciliation = making up (after a disagreement)
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • And how was I going to reconcile this new image of Baba with the one that had been imprinted on my mind for so long, that of him in his old brown suit, hobbling up the Taheris' driveway to ask for Soraya's hand?
    Khaled Hosseini  --  The Kite Runner
  • reconcile = bring into agreement (so it all fits together sensibly)
  • ...and she addressed Lady Bertram in a letter which spoke so much contrition and despondence, such a superfluity of children, and such a want of almost everything else, as could not but dispose them all to a reconciliation.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
reconciliation = making peace and coming together after being split by disagreement
(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —as in:
reconciled herself to
Definition to come to terms with
  • After the accident, she had to reconcile herself to life without loving parents.
reconcile = to come to terms with
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • Though she didn't like the class, she reconciled herself to making the best of it so it would not keep her from college.
  • reconciled = came to terms with
  • She has reconciled herself to the realization that while her father loves her, he will never understand her.
  • Let us not attempt to reconcile contradictions, but firmly embrace a rational alternative.
    Hamilton, Alexander  --  Federalist Papers Authored by Alexander Hamilton
  • Success went fizzily to Bernard's head, and in the process completely reconciled him (as any good intoxicant should do) to a world which, up till then, he had found very unsatisfactory.
    Aldous Huxley  --  Brave New World
  • reconciled = brought acceptance in
  • He was reconciled to what had happened, and went down again quite happy.
    Charles Dickens  --  A Christmas Carol
  • reconciled = resigned (having come to terms with something undesired)
  • My manner as I thus addressed him was impressive but calm; I had formed in my own heart a resolution to pursue my destroyer to death, and this purpose quieted my agony and for an interval reconciled me to life.
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
  • reconciled = brought to acceptance
  • "Cousin," said she, "something is going to happen which I do not like at all; and though you have often persuaded me into being reconciled to things that I disliked at first, you will not be able to do it now."
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • reconciled = accepting (coming to terms with)
  • Now I needed to understand how the great gatekeepers of history had come to terms with their own ignorance and partiality: I thought if I could accept that what they had written was not absolute but was the result of a biased process of conversation and revision, maybe I could reconcile myself with the fact that the history most people agreed upon was not the history I had been taught.
    Tara Westover  --  Educated
  • reconcile = come to terms with (get comfortable)
  • Even if the mission could reconcile itself to sending a woman doctor...
    Gloria Whelan  --  Listening for Lions
reconcile = to come to terms with

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
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