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reconcile

used in a sentence
2 meanings
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1  —as in:
reconciled their differences
Definition to bring into agreement
The exact meaning of reconcile can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "We reconciled our differences and are on friendly terms now." — settled or found a way to accept
  • "They did break up, but they reconciled since then." — made up
  • "I need to reconcile my goals with my abilities." — make compatible
  • "I need to reconcile my checkbook." — get the checkbook numbers and the bank statement to agree
  • She reconciled her checking account statement.
reconciled = brought into agreement (in this case, the statement from the bank with the record she kept in her check register)
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • His job includes reconciling all accounts.
  • reconciling = assuring agreement between
  • Let us hope still for something that will bring reconciliation.
    J.R.R. Tolkien  --  The Hobbit
  • reconciliation = reaching agreement (making up instead of fighting)
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • It was a moment of reconciliation, when the nagging hunger in his belly was forgotten and his earlier affection for her had temporarily revived.
    George Orwell  --  1984
  • reconciliation = when they were getting along well
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • I couldn't reconcile his world with mine so I separated them.
    Tara Westover  --  Educated
  • reconcile = make compatible
  • They just had a flaming row about it and have entered the "oh, my sweet Putti" and "darling Kerli" stage of reconciliation.
    Anne Frank  --  The Diary of a Young Girl
  • reconciliation = making up (after a disagreement)
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • ...and she addressed Lady Bertram in a letter which spoke so much contrition and despondence, such a superfluity of children, and such a want of almost everything else, as could not but dispose them all to a reconciliation.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • reconciliation = making peace and coming together after being split by disagreement
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • It had been a tragic war of brothers whose issues were best forgotten in the interests of family reconciliation.
    James M. McPherson  --  What They Fought For - 1861-1865
  • reconciliation = the act of bringing them back together agreeably
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • ...reach out and begin to build between you a bridge of reconciliation.
    William P. Young  --  The Shack
  • reconciliation = to end the conflict (bring into agreement)
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Then I would go into the attempt of the late medieval commentary to reconcile the diverse explanations of the commentaries.
    Chaim Potok  --  The Chosen
reconcile = bring into agreement

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —as in:
reconciled herself to
Definition to come to terms with
  • After the accident, she had to reconcile herself to life without loving parents.
reconcile = to come to terms with
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • Though she didn't like the class, she reconciled herself to making the best of it so it would not keep her from college.
  • reconciled = came to terms with
  • She has reconciled herself to the realization that while her father loves her, he will never understand her.
  • Let us not attempt to reconcile contradictions, but firmly embrace a rational alternative.
    Hamilton, Alexander  --  Federalist Papers Authored by Alexander Hamilton
  • "Cousin," said she, "something is going to happen which I do not like at all; and though you have often persuaded me into being reconciled to things that I disliked at first, you will not be able to do it now."
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • reconciled = accepting (coming to terms with)
  • Now I needed to understand how the great gatekeepers of history had come to terms with their own ignorance and partiality: I thought if I could accept that what they had written was not absolute but was the result of a biased process of conversation and revision, maybe I could reconcile myself with the fact that the history most people agreed upon was not the history I had been taught.
    Tara Westover  --  Educated
  • reconcile = come to terms with (get comfortable)
  • Even if the mission could reconcile itself to sending a woman doctor...
    Gloria Whelan  --  Listening for Lions
  • reconcile = to come to terms with
  • ...will reconcile me to the most hideous aspect of death.
    Edgar Allan Poe  --  MS. Found in a Bottle
  • reconcile = bring to terms
  • I couldn't reconcile the suffering of children with the idea of a merciful God.
    Jay Allison, et al.  --  This I Believe II
  • reconcile = make compatible (make fit together or bring to terms)
  • In a way it was good because it reconciled her to things.
    Zora Neale Hurston  --  Their Eyes Were Watching God
reconciled = brought to terms (made compatible)

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
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