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defer

used in a sentence
2 meanings
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1  —as in:
deferred the decision
Definition delay or postpone (hold off until a later time)
  • The weather forced us to defer our departure another day.
defer = delay
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • She deferred college until after serving in the military.
  • deferred = delayed
  • She asked to defer cross-examination until the morning.
  • defer = delay
  • The IRA permits investment earnings to grow tax-deferred until retirement.
  • deferred = delayed
  • Can we defer any expenses until January to make this year's profit look better?
  • defer = delay
  • Punishment might be deferred . . . but never escaped.
    Stephen King  --  Misery
  • deferred = postponed
  • I might not even go to school anyway. I might defer and join the Peace Corps and...
    Sarah Dessen  --  This Lullaby
  • defer = postpone
  • Sophi felt she was only deferring the problem.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie's World
  • deferring = postponing
  • It had taken all of Melanie's diplomacy to persuade them to defer their decision.
    Margaret Mitchell  --  Gone with the Wind
  • defer = postpone (put off until the future)
  • ...the professor also advised him to defer advanced science courses and concentrate for now on his English.
    Tracy Kidder  --  Strength in What Remains
defer = delay

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —as in:
deferred to her wishes
Definition submit or yield (typically to another person's opinion because of respect for that person or their knowledge)
  • I defer to her expertise.
defer = submit
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • They argued for some hours, but she finally deferred to his wishes.
  • deferred = yielded
  • He almost always defers to her wishes about which movie to see.
  • defers = submits
  • I began to defer, always, to the judgment of others.
    Tara Westover  --  Educated
  • defer = submit (or yield)
  • So Tom Buchanan and his girl and I went up together to New York — or not quite together, for Mrs. Wilson sat discreetly in another car. Tom deferred that much to the sensibilities of those East Eggers who might be on the train.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald  --  The Great Gatsby
  • deferred = submitted or yielded
  • I must defer to my father. He was there.
    James Bradley  --  Flags of Our Fathers
  • defer = submit or yield to another's opinion
  • We are obsessed with youth and defer to its tastes, and the language shows that.
    Robert MacNeil and William Crane  --  Do You Speak American?
  • defer = submit (our judgment to its)
  • He deferred to Prof but rarely to anybody else.
    Robert A. Heinlein  --  The Moon is a Harsh Mistress
  • deferred = yielded (to accept Prof's opinions over his own)
  • the rest of us have to defer to his knowledge
    Suzanne Collins  --  Catching Fire
  • defer = submit or yield
  • The boy defers to his father.
    Rick Riordan  --  The Lightning Thief
defers = submits

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
Less commonly:
More rarely, defer can be used to indicate showing respect or deference; as when Dickens wrote in Bleak House: "They know him there and defer to him."
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