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descend

used in a sentence
6 meanings
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1  —as in:
descend the mountain
Definition move or slope downward
  • We saw the rocket descend.
descend = move downward
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • The path descends to the bottom of the mountain.
  • descends = slopes downward
  • She saw him as he was descending the stairs.
  • descending = going down
  • Jack and Jill went up the hill, and then they descended.
  • Okonkwo's machete descended twice and the man's head lay beside his uniformed body.
    Chinua Achebe  --  Things Fall Apart
  • descended = moved down
  • Lina's arms were just long enough to reach past Poppy and hold on to the ladder. She descended very slowly.
    Jeanne DuPrau  --  The City of Ember
  • descended = climbed down
  • Kinney turned the plane again, descended very low over camp, and dipped his wings.
    Laura Hillenbrand  --  Unbroken
  • descended = moved downward
  • The dangling, shiny prize of peace just out of grasp until finally her body descends to the bottom and settles in murky quiet.
    Delia Owens  --  Where the Crawdads Sing
  • descends = goes downward
  • After descending about eighty feet, I got back on reasonably solid ground.
    Jon Krakauer  --  Into the Wild
  • descending = moving downward
  • We nodded as she slowly descended the stairs.
    Mildred D. Taylor  --  Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry
descended = came down

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —as in:
in descending order
Definition move down a scale — as from larger numbers to smaller, or higher notes to lower
  • The three most populous countries in descending order are China, India, and the United States.
descending = moving from larger numbers to smaller numbers
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • She practiced by playing a descending scale.
  • descending = moving downward (figuratively) to a lower pitch
  • These are my goals in descending order of importance.
  • descending = moving downward (figuratively) on a scale of importance
  • The three largest countries in descending order are Russia, Canada, and the United States.
  • descending = larger to smaller
  • Print one list by name in alphabetical order and another by amount contributed in descending order.
  • descending = moving from larger numbers to smaller numbers
  • Very slowly, "Oh, Ford, Ford, Ford," it said diminishingly and on a descending scale.
    Aldous Huxley  --  Brave New World
  • descending = moving downward in lowness of pitch
  • They seemed to be numbered in descending order.
    Michael Crichton  --  Jurassic Park
  • descending = moving downward from larger to smaller numbers
  • The ballot itself was a long, narrow piece of paper with the parties listed in descending order to the left, and then the symbol of the party and a picture of its leader to the right.
    Nelson Mandela  --  Long Walk to Freedom
  • descending = from largest to smallest (probably from the party with the most members to the one with the least members)
  • And when you're a man who is variously described as dutiful, deferential, obsequious, slavish and brown-nosingly corrupt, in descending order of distinction, you need to make a show of character now and then.
    Don DeLillo  --  Underworld
descending = moving downward on a scale from most to least distinct

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
3  —as in:
descend from royalty
Definition figuratively, to have come down a path from the past; i.e., to originate or come from — such as in reference to ancestors or evolutionary origins
  • She descended from an old Italian noble family.
descended = came from (had as an ancestor)
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • They say all dogs are descended from wolves.
  • descended = came from (evolved from)
  • A group of languages that descend form a common language ancestor is known as a language family.
  • descend = come from (in the past)
  • I descended from Armenian immigrants.
  • descended = came from (had as ancestors)
  • It is a tradition descending from an over-1000-year-old religious practice.
  • descending = coming from (in the past)
  • She concludes that all mammalian species are likely descended from a common ancestor.
  • descended = came from (evolved from)
  • Do you believe we're descended from apes?
    David Almond  --  Skellig
  • descended = evolved
  • The tribal lineage descends from the father's side, the male ancestors.
    Marcus Luttrell  --  Lone Survivor
  • descends = comes (genetically)
  • For example, the clans of the American hunting tribes commonly regarded themselves as descended from half-animal, half-human ancestors.
    Joseph Campbell  --  The Hero With a Thousand Faces
  • descended = having come (as though genetically)
  • Descended from the dinosaurs.
    John Green  --  Turtles All the Way Down
descended = evolved from

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
4  —as in:
descend into poverty
Definition figuratively, to move downward to a worse or less prestigious situation
  • Partisan politics has descended to new lows.
descended = move downward (figuratively) to a worse condition
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • When she got sick, the family descended into poverty.
  • descended = move downward (figuratively) to a worse or less prestigious situation
  • I will not descend to hurling insults in return.
  • descend = move downward (figuratively) to a worse or less prestigious situation
  • The country descended into chaos.
  • descended = move downward (figuratively) to a worse condition
  • She predicts the country will descend into anarchy.
  • descend = move downward (figuratively) to a worse condition
  • Felt myself slipping, but even that's a metaphor. Descending, but that is, too. Can't describe the feeling itself except to say that I'm not me.
    John Green  --  Turtles All the Way Down
  • descending = moving to a worse situation
  • That night the electricity went out, cut off by the authorities, and Kensington and Chelsea descended into darkness.
    Moshin Hamid  --  Exit West
  • descended = transformed (to a lower or less good condition)
  • Once again in his tormenter's clutches, Louie descended back into a state of profound stress.
    Laura Hillenbrand  --  Unbroken
  • descended = moved (to a lower or less good condition)
  • Shawn said it was time to mount, and I climbed onto the barn roof, sure the corral would descend into violence.
    Tara Westover  --  Educated
  • descend = figuratively, move downward to a worse situation
  • Hester Prynne went one day to the mansion of Governor Bellingham, with a pair of gloves which she had fringed and embroidered to his order, and which were to be worn on some great occasion of state; for, though the chances of a popular election had caused this former ruler to descend a step or two from the highest rank, he still held an honourable and influential place among the colonial magistracy.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  The Scarlet Letter
descend = figuratively, move downward to a less prestigious situation

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
5  —as in:
descend the abstraction ladder
Definition to move from a higher level of abstraction downward to a lower one (from more general to more specific)
  • The further you descend from more abstract to more concrete words, the easier it is to visualize the word's meaning.
descend = move from more general to more specific
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • Our conversation descended from philosophical goals to political maneuvering.
  • descended = moved from more general to more specific
  • The problem became much clearer when our look descended into details.
  • descended = moved from the more general to the more specific
  • You're going to need to descend the abstraction ladder to explain that to me.
descend = move from more general to more specific

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
6  —as in:
thieves descended upon us
Definition to come or arrive — especially suddenly or from above or as an attack
  • Despair descended upon us.
descended = came suddenly
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • Night descended upon us.
  • descended = arrived
  • Thieves descended upon us.
  • descended = came suddenly
  • A feeling of hopelessness descended upon us.
  • descended = came
  • A seriousness descended on the crowd.
  • descended = came suddenly
  • These moods descended on her suddenly and for no apparent reason.
    Chinua Achebe  --  Things Fall Apart
  • descended = came
  • A sharp fear descended also, and the call to prayer they had often heard in the distance from the park was silenced.
    Moshin Hamid  --  Exit West
  • descended = came
  • The city was silent and emptied of people and traffic as if a plague had descended.
    Malala Yousafzai  --  I Am Malala
  • descended = arrived
  • At last the term ended, and a silence deep as the snow on the grounds descended on the castle.
    J.K. Rowling  --  Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
  • descended = came or arrived
  • A smart crackle of blows, a few agonized howls, and silence and order descended suddenly on the room.
    Elizabeth George Speare  --  The Witch of Blackbird Pond
descended = came

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
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