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extenuating

used in a sentence
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Definition lessen or to try to lessen the seriousness or extent of
  • He was convicted, but with extenuating circumstances, and condemned to hard labour in Siberia for fifteen years.
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky  --  The Idiot
  • My self-extenuation sounded unexpectedly and thoroughly foolish even to me who had believed in it with all my heart.
    Hermann Hesse  --  Steppenwolf
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Now, maybe there were extenuating circumstances, maybe the road was slippery or something else was out of whack.
    Chris Kyle  --  American Sniper
  • Neither Mrs. Maylie, nor Harry, nor Rose (who all came in together), could offer a word in extenuation.
    Charles Dickens  --  Oliver Twist
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • "O.C. Bible: "Any sin can be ascribed, at least in part, to a natural bad tendency that is an extenuating circumstance acceptable to God."
    Frank Herbert  --  Dune
  • Thus they conversed; and there was nobody to set before Elizabeth any extenuation of the absent one's deceit.
    Thomas Hardy  --  The Mayor of Casterbridge
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • But the results, we know, were not of a kind to warrant this extenuation of the past.
    George Eliot  --  The Mill on the Floss
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • It is in vain, sir, to extenuate the matter.
    Patrick Henry  --  Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death
  • — I hope this history of my conduct towards her will be admitted by you and my father as great extenuation of what you saw amiss.
    Jane Austen  --  Emma
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • That I could suggest anything in extenuation!
    Jane Austen  --  Northanger Abbey
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • "I shall bring that forward as an extenuating circumstance," replied Eugenie.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Count of Monte Cristo
  • If I were in a court of law seeking mercy for an ignominious act, I would have to plead extenuating circumstances.
    Robert Ludlum  --  The Bourne Supremacy
  • She had what she wanted, an extenuating circumstance ... and no doubt she didn't really care whether we got away or not.
    Louis L'Amour  --  The Broken Gun
  • There are extenuating circumstances.
    Agatha Christie  --  Murder On The Orient Express
  • Counsel for the defense raised his arms to heaven and pleaded guilty, but with extenuating circumstances.
    Albert Camus  --  The Stranger
  • And before a court less arbitrary and more merciful than a martial one, that plea would largely extenuate.
    Herman Melville  --  Billy Budd
  • Were such a man once more to fall, what plea could be urged in extenuation of his crime?
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  The Scarlet Letter
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • They may extenuate, but can they ac quit?
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Pioneers
  • There were extenuating circumstances .... or were they aggravating?
    Eugene Ionesco  --  Rhinoceros
  • He confessed that much to me in extenuation of the shady part he had played in Sherif Ali's plot to do away with the infidel.
    Joseph Conrad  --  Lord Jim
(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)

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