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wean

used in a sentence
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Definition to adapt to
in various senses, including:
  • "She was weaned at 3 months." — a mammal's adaption to the removal of breastmilk (note this is the unqualified sense)
  • "I weaned myself from cigarettes." — adapted to the gradual removal of
  • "I was weaned on progressive principals" — raised on or adapted to at a very early age.
  • Worldwide, most babies are weaned much later, but in the US, fewer than 20% of babies are still nursing when they are six months old.
weaned = adapt to the removal of breastmilk
  • She weaned her baby when he was three months old and started him on cow's milk.
  • weaned = adapted to the removal of breastmilk
  • The kitten was weaned and fed by its owner with a bottle.
  • I grew concerned and weaned myself to no more than one drink a day and never two days in a row.
  • I was weaned on country music and have loved it ever since.
  • She's weaning them from her.
    Sharon Creech  --  Walk Two Moons
  • weaning = adapting to the removal of breastmilk from diet
  • The first of those sorrows which are sent to wean us from the earth had visited her, and its dimming influence quenched her dearest smiles.
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
  • wean = help adapt to the gradual removal of
  • And she was wean'd,
    William Shakespeare  --  Romeo and Juliet
  • wean'd = adapted to not drinking breastmilk
  • But Iphitos had come there tracking strays, twelve shy mares, with mule colts yet unweaned.
    Homer  --  The Odyssey
  • (Editor's note:  The prefix "un-" in unweaned means not and reverses the meaning of weaned. This is the same pattern you see in words like unhappy, unknown, and unlucky.)
  • I have a dozen mares at pasture there with mule colts yet unweaned.
    Homer  --  The Odyssey
  • (Editor's note:  The prefix "un-" in unweaned means not and reverses the meaning of weaned. This is the same pattern you see in words like unhappy, unknown, and unlucky.)
  • A woman with an unweaned baby, an old woman, and a healthy German girl with bright red cheeks were sitting on some feather beds.
    Leo Tolstoy  --  War and Peace
  • (Editor's note:  The prefix "un-" in unweaned means not and reverses the meaning of weaned. This is the same pattern you see in words like unhappy, unknown, and unlucky.)
  • The captive raised her face; it was as soft and mild As sculptured marble saint; or slumbering unweaned child; It was so soft and mild, it was so sweet and fair, Pain could not trace a line, or grief a shadow there!
    Margaret Atwood  --  Alias Grace
(Editor's note:  The prefix "un-" in unweaned means not and reverses the meaning of weaned. This is the same pattern you see in words like unhappy, unknown, and unlucky.)

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