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subversion

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Definition undermining (gradually destroying from within) — an established order such as a government, institution, or morality
  • The Chinese activist was imprisoned for encouraging subversion of state power.
subversion = gradual destruction (of an established order)
  • The dictatorship has been charging human rights activists with subversion.
  • subversion = gradual destruction (of an established order)
  • Let all our neighbors know that we shall join with them to oppose aggression or subversion anywhere in the Americas.
    Kennedy, John F.  --  John F. Kennedy's Inaugural Address
  • Do seek subversion of thy harmless life?
    Shakespeare, William  --  King Henry VI, Part 2
  • People like Martin Luther King, they said, were just troublemakers and subversives.
    John Howard Griffin  --  Black Like Me
  • subversives = people who undermine (gradually destroy) the existing social order
  • Let all our neighbors know that we shall join with them to oppose aggression or subversion anywhere in the Americas.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Ask Not What Your Country Can Do For You
  • subversion = gradual destruction (of an established order)
  • No subversive literature was ever in her shop, nor our home, nor that hotel room; distribution was done by kids, too young to read.
    Robert A. Heinlein  --  The Moon is a Harsh Mistress
  • subversive = intended to undermine a government
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • "He was subversive, though," Will said.
    "Why? Because he made the priest the bad guy and the ugly guy good?"
    "That was part of it."
    Alex Flinn  --  Beastly
  • subversive = working to undermine existing institutions
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • They're worse than useless; they are, in fact, subversive.
    Peter Shaffer  --  Equus
  • subversive = working to gradually destroy an established order
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • A new doctrine seems at first a subversion of all our opinions, tastes, and manner of living.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo  --  Essays, First Series
  • One example is sufficient to illustrate the power of antitrust to subvert competition.
    William F. Shughart II  --  Private Antitrust Enforcement: Compensation, Deterrence, or Extortion?  --  http://www.cato.org/pubs/regulation/regv13n3/reg13n3-shughart.html (retrieved 06/28/06)
  • the big city's subversion of rural innocence
  • Initially, the state tried to control or outlaw them [electronic devices like VCRs and the Walkmans] because it knew how subversive they could be.
    Tom Palmer  --  Why Socialism Collapsed in Eastern Europe  --  http://www.cato.org/special/berlinwall/palmer1990.html (retrieved 06/28/06)
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • Bulstrode's subversion as an instrument of good; but the threat must have been permitted, and was a chastisement of a new kind.
    Eliot, George  --  Middlemarch
  • Kat looked annoyed for the subversion of her parental authority.
    Gayle Forman  --  Where She Went
  • Well, it is certainly important to subvert the patriarchal paradigm, and I suppose this is a way.
    John Green  --  Looking for Alaska
  • "Archibald and Mordred both used it to subvert another's will," he continued, "to control.
    James A. Owen  --  Here, There be Dragons
  • None may stand before us once we set forth to cleanse Alagaesia of every miscreant, traitor, and subversive.
    Christopher Paolini  --  Eldest
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • Principles which could be subverted by feeling in one direction were liable to the same catastrophe in another.
    Thomas Hardy  --  Jude the Obscure
  • Every discovery in pure science is potentially subversive; even science must sometimes be treated as a possible enemy.
    Aldous Huxley  --  Brave New World
(editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)

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