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vocabulary
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seduce

used in a sentence
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Definition to persuade someone to do something by tempting them with something pleasurable or desired — often to make them want to have sex

The passive form, seduced can also mean to have won over as in "She was seduced into buying the house by the beautiful yard."
  • She was seduced by the temptation of easy money.
seduced = persuaded to do something
  • She seduced him and then bragged about it.
  • seduced = persuaded into having sex
  • She finds power seductive.
  • seductive = highly desirable or tempting
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • Seducing her was easy.
  • seducing = persuading to have sex
  • She smiles seductively as if she's wanting something more than a truce.
    Simone Elkeles  --  Perfect Chemistry
  • seductively = in a manner intended to be sexually alluring
  • He even seemed relieved to have somebody to tell about how he was seduced.
    Sylvia Plath  --  The Bell Jar
  • seduced = lured or enticed  to do something he would not normally do
  • I did try to seduce her.
    Christina Garcia  --  Dreaming in Cuban
  • seduce = to entice someone into having sex
  • You're not a creature of impulse, and though I believe you could be seduced, with the right timing, and the right touch, it wouldn't be an ordinary occurrence.
    J.D. Robb  --  Naked in Death
  • seduced = enticed into having sex
  • Feeling gave expression to her countenance and softness to her voice, rendering her who was always beautiful, trebly seductive and winning.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Deerslayer
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • In a week's time he seduced me down to the door.
    Jonathan Swift  --  Gulliver's Travels
  • All of it connects together, the tale of the Red devil who seduced a prince, who made him kill a king.
    Victoria Aveyard  --  Red Queen
  • But it was not alone the distance that had attracted the Savage to his lighthouse; the near was as seductive as the far.
    Aldous Huxley  --  Brave New World
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • Faces somber with achieved seduction.
    Toni Morrison  --  Song of Solomon
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • It grosses me out, like he thinks he can seduce me with fresh breath.
    Lauren Oliver  --  Before I Fall
  • However, like all dangerous deceptions, the lies that clappers tell themselves wear seductive disguises.
    Neal Shusterman  --  Unwind
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • Rest was seductive, made more so by his tendency to improve the situation through imagination.
    Larry McMurtry  --  Lonesome Dove
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • Perhaps she had lingered in Qarth too long, seduced by its comforts and its beauties.
    George R.R. Martin  --  A Clash of Kings
  • MEPHISTOPHELES Tis magic all, thou fool, seduced so easily!
    Goethe (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe)  --  Faust
  • "I never even asked her who seduced her," said Margaret, dwelling on the hateful word thoughtfully.
    E.M. Forster  --  Howards End
  • Tolstoy would have said that poetry is to be judged by its meaning, and that seductive sounds merely cause false meanings to go unnoticed.
    George Orwell  --  Lear, Tolstoy and the Fool
(editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)

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