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vocabulary
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resuscitate

used in a sentence
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Definition to bring back to life or cause to regain consciousness — as when someone's heart is re-started after it stops or when a drowning victim is revived
  • She administered CPR, but was unable to resuscitate him.
  • She administered CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation).
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Her heart stopped, but they were able to resuscitate her with a portable defibrillator.
  • She signed a do not resuscitate order.
  • So that was not only the end of his life, but the end of any possible resuscitation of This I Believe.
    Jay Allison, et al.  --  This I Believe
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • He rushes within, fumbles with the handcuffs and unlocks them, raises the body to a sitting position while he tries to give resuscitation.
    Wole Soyinka  --  Death and the King's Horseman
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • She dropped to her knees, and while I fanned away yellow jackets with peach branch leaves, she gave Jim Ed mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.
    Dori Sanders  --  Clover
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • When he came outside again, Donna was still administering mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to their dead son.
    Stephen King  --  Cujo
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Once they resuscitated her at the hospital, the police found some outstanding bad-check warrants, so she'd had to choose: rehab or jail.
    Sarah Dessen  --  Lock and Key
  • Then Henchard shaved for the first time during many days, and put on clean linen, and combed his hair; and was as a man resuscitated thenceforward.
    Thomas Hardy  --  The Mayor of Casterbridge
  • There is no chance for mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, as was attempted when Lincoln lay dying on the floor of his Ford's Theatre box.
    Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Kennedy
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Ever hear of people being resuscitated after they have apparently drowned?
    Theodore Dreiser  --  An American Tragedy
  • She peeks into the ambulance as she crosses the street, sees the resuscitative equipment but no people.
    Jhumpa Lahiri  --  The Namesake
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • And that piece of filth you're trying to resuscitate—I suggest you get rid of him before he starts to rot.
    Cassandra Clare  --  City of Fallen Angels
  • 'Come down here and assist to resuscitate.
    Rudyard Kipling  --  Kim
  • Kate lay amid the solemn monitoring and resuscitation equipment in the close quarters of the rescue ambulance.
    James Patterson  --  Kiss the Girls
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Working quickly, Leale straddles Lincoln's chest and begins resuscitating the president, hoping to improve the flow of oxygen to the brain.
    Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Lincoln
  • And so he ran down and tried to resuscitate him.
    Chris Kyle  --  American Sniper
  • Except that surely the casualty team wouldn't keep arguing about the best way to resuscitate the patient?
    Sophie Kinsella  --  Confessoins of a Shopaholic
  • I believe if I could have resuscitated him I would have done so for the sole purpose of murdering him!
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky  --  The Idiot

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®Wikipedia: Cardiopulmonary ResuscitationWikipedia: DefibrillationPictures — Google Images®
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