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probate

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Definition establish the legal validity of a will; or a judicial certificate stating such which enables an executor to implement the will
  • She is a probate judge.
  • She asked the lawyer if a trust could be created that would bypass probate.
  • New York has courts of common law, courts of probates (similar to the spiritual courts in England), a court of admiralty, and a court of chancery.
    Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, & John Jay  --  The Federalist Papers — Modern English Edition 2
  • I do NOT need ANY of this, and I do NOT need any probate court, no judge and no lawyer, and I will not have my sister Jennifer set foot in this city.
    Steve Lopez  --  The Soloist
  • In rebuttal, Counsel Smith suggested that the present situation was "far graver than a simple sanity hearing in probate court.
    Truman Capote  --  In Cold Blood
  • "He's having financial difficulties that will be eased after his mother's will is probated.
    J.D. Robb  --  Glory in Death
  • Marriage licences and small probates were what we all looked for, and what paid us best; and the competition for these ran very high indeed.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • I found out he is a specialist in wills and probate.
    Jojo Moyes  --  Me Before You
  • And Pogie—a probate—had jumped at the chance to earn his bones by carrying out a murder sanctioned by the Aryan Brotherhood.
    Jodi Picoult  --  Change of Heart
  • And when he died in 1904 he had been rich, according to the probate of the will.
    Robert Penn Warren  --  All the King's Men
  • The bond the probate court had had her post was perhaps their evaluation in dollars of how much did stand in her way.
    Thomas Pynchon  --  The Crying of Lot 49
  • I promised him that I'd see the estate all the way through probate, too, but that won't be a problem, since the estate is small and you're his only child.
    Nicholas Sparks  --  Dear John
  • And a slip of paper from the probate court telling me that some person was committed as insane.
    Robert M. Pirsig  --  Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance
  • We have courts of common law, courts of probates (analogous in certain matters to the spiritual courts in England), a court of admiralty and a court of chancery.
    Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, & John Jay  --  The Federalist Papers
  • But he has never been to this neighborhood on his own, and in spite of the directions he's written on a sheet of paper he gets briefly lost on his way to the Middlesex Probate and Family Court.
    Jhumpa Lahiri  --  The Namesake
  • Dickens uses a miasma, a literal and figurative fog, for the Court of Chancery, the English version of American probate court where estates are sorted out and wills contested, in Bleak House (1853).
    Thomas C. Foster  --  How to Read Literature Like a Professor
  • I'll be handling the probate over the next few months, but essentially, the remainder of his estate will be sold, with the proceeds to benefit the Pediatric Cancer Center at Duke University Hospital."
    Nicholas Sparks  --  The Best of Me
  • He, or whatever his subjects called him, occupied the leading administrative office in his county—usually he was sheriff or judge or probate—but there were mutations, like Maycomb's Willoughby, who chose to grace no public office.
    Harper Lee  --  Go Set a Watchman
  • Stingo, you may recall a number of years ago when your grandmother's will was probated we were all baffled by her reference to a certain sum in gold coins which she bequeathed to her grandchildren but which we could never find.
    William Styron  --  Sophie's Choice
  • What would the probate judge have to say about spreading some kind of a legacy among them all, all those nameless, maybe as a first installment?
    Thomas Pynchon  --  The Crying of Lot 49

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