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presumption

used in a sentence
2 meanings
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1  —as in:
presumption of innocence
Definition to think of something as true or likely, even though it is not known with certainty
  • I presumed she was an expert since she spoke so confidently.
presumed = assumed
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • The police's presumption of guilt against the suspect caused them to overlook important evidence.
  • presumption = assumption
  • The presumption of innocence does no prevent holding a defendant thought to be a danger to society.
  • presumption = the legal assumption that something is true unless proved otherwise
  • Nor did one know what became of them, apart from the few who were hanged as war-criminals: the others simply vanished, presumably into forced-labour camps.
    George Orwell  --  1984
  • presumably = probably
    (Editor's note:  The suffix "-ably" is a combination of the suffixes "-able" and "-ly". It means in a manner that is capable of being. This is the same pattern you see in words like agreeably, favorably, and comfortably.)
  • Two hundred and twenty-five men from the 11th had gone missing and were presumed dead, including twenty-six from Louie's 42nd squadron.
    Laura Hillenbrand  --  Unbroken
  • presumed = probably (thought of as true without certainty)
  • I presume they would be lethal if a sufficiently large dose were given.
    Agatha Christie  --  And Then There Were None
  • presume = assume
  • Hundreds of men had gone missing during the military campaign, presumably picked up by the army or ISI, but no one would say.
    Malala Yousafzai  --  I Am Malala
  • presumably = thought to have probably been
    (Editor's note:  The suffix "-ably" is a combination of the suffixes "-able" and "-ly". It means in a manner that is capable of being. This is the same pattern you see in words like agreeably, favorably, and comfortably.)
  • Besides, the shovels were locked up at night, presumably so they couldn't be used as weapons.
    Louis Sachar  --  Holes
  • presumably = probably
    (Editor's note:  The suffix "-ably" is a combination of the suffixes "-able" and "-ly". It means in a manner that is capable of being. This is the same pattern you see in words like agreeably, favorably, and comfortably.)
  • I presume they will perform an autopsy.
    Ellen Raskin  --  The Westing Game
  • presume = assume
  • None of them, I presume, had ever read a page of my inditing, or would have cared a fig the more for me if they had read them all;
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  The Scarlet Letter
presume = assume

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®Wikipedia — Presumption of Innocence
2  —as in:
she is presumptuous
Definition exercising privileges to which one is not entitled — such as being too familiar or too bossy
  • She is pushy and presumptuous. I can't stand to be around her.
presumptuous = exercising privileges to which one is not entitled
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • Her presumption is intolerable.
  • presumption = rudeness
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • the duchess would not put up with presumptuous servants
  • If he wanted, he would send for her; and even to offer an early return was a presumption which hardly anything would have seemed to justify.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • presumption = assumption of a privilege to which one is not entitled
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • "Do not presume to tell me what it means!" the mayor cried.
    Jeanne DuPrau  --  The City of Ember
  • presume = exercise privileges to which one is not entitled
  • "It is not our custom to fight for our gods," said one of them. "Let us not presume to do so now."
    Chinua Achebe  --  Things Fall Apart
  • presume = be so bold as
  • And God forbid you should presume to serve with a dangling button—for next thing you knew, it would be floating in a customer's vichyssoise.
    Amor Towles  --  A Gentleman in Moscow
  • presume = be so bold as
  • Goddess, I know I presume, but will you do me the honor of dining with me?
    Madeline Miller  --  Circe
  • presume = am bolder than is proper
  • And Redd would have been queen—she would have ruled with all the innate power she possessed—if not for the presumption of her sister.
    Frank Beddor  --  The Looking Glass Wars
  • presumption = exercise of privilege to which one is not entitled
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • No one on the island had ever presumed to stare like that at Sir Francis Tyler's granddaughter.
    Elizabeth George Speare  --  The Witch of Blackbird Pond
presumed = acted so boldly as

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
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