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presumption

used in a sentence
2 meanings
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1  —as in:
presumption of innocence
Definition to think of something as true or likely, even though it is not known with certainty
  • I presumed she was an expert since she spoke so confidently.
presumed = assumed
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • The police's presumption of guilt against the suspect caused them to overlook important evidence.
  • presumption = assumption
  • The presumption of innocence does no prevent holding a defendant thought to be a danger to society.
  • presumption = the legal assumption that something is true unless proved otherwise
  • Nor did one know what became of them, apart from the few who were hanged as war-criminals: the others simply vanished, presumably into forced-labour camps.
    George Orwell  --  1984
  • presumably = probably
    (Editor's note:  The suffix "-ably" is a combination of the suffixes "-able" and "-ly". It means in a manner that is capable of being. This is the same pattern you see in words like agreeably, favorably, and comfortably.)
  • Besides, the shovels were locked up at night, presumably so they couldn't be used as weapons.
    Louis Sachar  --  Holes
  • presumably = probably
    (Editor's note:  The suffix "-ably" is a combination of the suffixes "-able" and "-ly". It means in a manner that is capable of being. This is the same pattern you see in words like agreeably, favorably, and comfortably.)
  • After five minutes of perfect quiet, the same sequence repeats itself three more times, after which he's presumably lulled himself back to sleep for a while.
    Anne Frank  --  The Diary of a Young Girl
  • presumably = probably
    (Editor's note:  The suffix "-ably" is a combination of the suffixes "-able" and "-ly". It means in a manner that is capable of being. This is the same pattern you see in words like agreeably, favorably, and comfortably.)
  • I presume that the sanguine temperament itself and the disturbing influence end in a mentally-accomplished finish, a possibly dangerous man, probably dangerous if unselfish.
    Bram Stoker  --  Dracula
  • presume = assume
  • The Count was presumably right to be concerned for Nina, though we will never know for certain—for she did not return to the Metropol within the month, within the year, or ever again.
    Amor Towles  --  A Gentleman in Moscow
  • presumably = probably
    (Editor's note:  The suffix "-ably" is a combination of the suffixes "-able" and "-ly". It means in a manner that is capable of being. This is the same pattern you see in words like agreeably, favorably, and comfortably.)
  • It was presumed that Mr. Crawford was travelling back, to London, on the morrow, for nothing more was seen of him at Mr. Price's; and two days afterwards, it was a fact ascertained to Fanny by the following letter from his sister, opened and read by her, on another account, with the most anxious curiosity:
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • presumed = assumed
  • I think Mother has presumed him dead for a long time already.
    Barbara Kingsolver  --  The Poisonwood Bible
presumed = thought of something as true or likely, even though it was not known with certainty

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®Wikipedia — Presumption of Innocence
2  —as in:
she is presumptuous
Definition exercising privileges to which one is not entitled — such as being too familiar or too bossy
  • She is pushy and presumptuous. I can't stand to be around her.
presumptuous = exercising privileges to which one is not entitled
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • Her presumption is intolerable.
  • presumption = rudeness
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • the duchess would not put up with presumptuous servants
  • If he wanted, he would send for her; and even to offer an early return was a presumption which hardly anything would have seemed to justify.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • presumption = assumption of a privilege to which one is not entitled
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • And God forbid you should presume to serve with a dangling button—for next thing you knew, it would be floating in a customer's vichyssoise.
    Amor Towles  --  A Gentleman in Moscow
  • presume = be so bold as
  • Goddess, I know I presume, but will you do me the honor of dining with me?
    Madeline Miller  --  Circe
  • presume = am bolder than is proper
  • I think he realizes that his presumptuous little flirtation is over.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald  --  The Great Gatsby
  • presumptuous = inappropriately bold (exercising privileges to which he is not entitled)
  • You will, I am sure, excuse my presumption
    Arthur Conan Doyle  --  The Hound of the Baskervilles
  • presumption = exercise of social privileges to which one might not entitled
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Of course, I could not have expressed this view to Mr Farraday without embarking upon what might have seemed a presumptuous speech.
    Kazuo Ishiguro  --  The Remains of the Day
  • presumptuous = exercising social privileges to which one is not entitled
  • To call or to fancy it a loss, a disappointment, would be a presumption for which she had not words strong enough to satisfy her own humility.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
presumption = assumption of a privilege to which one is not entitled
(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
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