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plasticity

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Definition describing a material that can be shaped through bending or other force

or:

an ability to change such as the brain's ability to change how it processes information or an organism's ability to respond to varying environments
  • plasticity of cold metals
  • exercise may help brain plasticity
  • atomistic analysis of crystal plasticity in a copper nanowire during tensile loading
  • With all a child's plasticity, Laurella dropped into the improved order of things.
    Grace MacGowan Cooke  --  The Power and the Glory
  • As soon as the wax had softened to the plasticity of dough she kneaded the pieces together.
    Thomas Hardy  --  The Return of the Native
  • Nevertheless, Nature had given him plasticity.
    Jack London  --  White Fang
  • To that, to the study of the plasticity of living forms, my life has been devoted.
    H.G. Wells  --  The Island of Dr. Moreau
  • I pull back, shocked by her cool plasticity.
    Dan Simmons  --  Hyperion
  • It possessed the sickish plasticity (at the back of her arms it was especially noticeable) of one who has suffered severe emaciation and whose flesh is even now in the last stages of being restored.
    William Styron  --  Sophie's Choice
  • And as, in the shaded light, she moved yearningly toward him, sheathed plastically in her gown of rich velvet, he would detach gently the round arms that clung about his neck, the firm curved body that stuck gluily to his.
    Thomas Wolfe  --  Look Homeward, Angel
  • Straggled out along the red clay road, they formed a column that ran from the base of the mountain, where the Third Squad had just begun the ascent, to the top of the mountain, where the First Squad moved plastically along a plateau and toward the west and toward the much higher mountains where the battle was being fought.
    Tim O'Brien  --  Going After Cacciato
  • But Dick's necessity of behaving as he did was a projection of some submerged reality: he was compelled to walk there, or stand there, his shirt-sleeve fitting his wrist and his coat sleeve encasing his shirt-sleeve like a sleeve valve, his collar molded plastically to his neck, his red hair cut exactly, his hand holding his small briefcase like a dandy—just as another man once found it necessary to stand in front of a church in Ferrara, in sackcloth and ashes.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald  --  Tender is the Night
  • In plasticity, functions once governed by a set of cells in the brain are taken over by another set of cells.
    Ben Carson  --  Gifted Hands
  • That's why plasticity only works in children.
    Ben Carson  --  Gifted Hands
  • Maranda manages well without the left half of her brain because of a phenomenon we call plasticity.
    Ben Carson  --  Gifted Hands
  • It was another instance of the plasticity of his clay, of his capacity for being moulded by the pressure of environment.
    Jack London  --  White Fang
  • I wanted—it was the one thing I wanted—to find out the extreme limit of plasticity in a living shape.
    H.G. Wells  --  The Island of Dr. Moreau
  • For her, teaching was its own exceeding great reward—her lyric music, her life, the world in which plastically she built to beauty what was good, the lord of her soul that gave her spirit life while he broke her body.
    Thomas Wolfe  --  Look Homeward, Angel
  • To accomplish the change was like a reflux of being, and this when the plasticity of youth was no longer his; when the fibre of him had become tough and knotty; when the warp and the woof of him had made of him an adamantine texture, harsh and unyielding; when the face of his spirit had become iron and all his instincts and axioms had crystallised into set rules, cautions, dislikes, and desires.
    Jack London  --  White Fang
  • He puts things in their attitudes, He puts to-day out of himself with plasticity and love, He places his own times, reminiscences, parents, brothers and sisters, associations, employment, politics, so that the rest never shame them afterward, nor assume to command them.
    Walt Whitman  --  Leaves of Grass

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