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octogenarian

used in a sentence
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Definition someone whose age is in the eighties
  • In the study, women in their 70s increased muscle mass from the exercise, but octogenarian women did not.
  • When you get to be an octogenarian, you grow as accustomed as one can to losing friends and family.
    Jim Stovall  --  The Ultimate Gift
  • octogenarian = someone whose age is in the eighties
  • They looked like twelve octogenarian children as they filed into their seats.
    Pat Conroy  --  The Lords of Discipline
  • She enjoyed reorganizing the tack room with Meara, and working with Mick on instructing one young rider, and one feisty octogenarian in the ring.
    Nora Roberts  --  Dark Witch
  • And he made a friend, a dignified octogenarian named Martha.
    Tracy Kidder  --  Strength in What Remains
  • G——, calm, his body almost upright, his voice vibrating, was one of those octogenarians who form the subject of astonishment to the physiologist.
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables
  • It was covered with an immaculate cloth, and tended by a young woman apparently unused to the business, she being accompanied by a boy with an octogenarian face, who assisted her.
    Thomas Hardy  --  Jude the Obscure
  • As it was considered that the Austerlitz success might have been more decisive had the commander in chief not been so young, all our octogenarians were reviewed, and of Prozorovski and Kamenski the latter was preferred.
    Leo Tolstoy  --  War and Peace
  • Sliding in and out of the groups of octogenarians are hustling, overdressed boys who've watched too many Vegas movies and don't know how poignant they are, trying to imitate Rat Pack cool in cheap suits in the Missouri woods.
    Gillian Flynn  --  Gone Girl
  • It was a genuine remnant of the Old South, with rocking chairs on high verandahs and venerable octogenarians and their aristocratic progeny carrying on the myth and legend which ended reluctantly at Appomattox Courthouse.
    Pat Conroy  --  The Water is Wide
  • ...business suits, men in shorts and bright polo shirts, four young Hasidic Jews arguing (but joyfully) over the most mystical of all documents (a Los Angeles freeway map), uniformed soldiers, giggling children and shrieking children and two placid octogenarians in wheelchairs, a pair of tall Arab princes in akals and kaffiyehs and flowing djellabas, preceded by fierce bodyguards and trailed by retinues, beacon-red tourists drifting homeward on the astringent fumes of medicated sunburn...
    Dean Koontz  --  Sole Survivor
  • Marius on that barricade after the octogenarian was the vision of the young revolution after the apparition of the old.
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables
  • And the octogenarian went on in a grave and angry voice:— "Come, now, what do you want of me?"
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables
  • He could hear the octogenarian breathe.
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables
  • When you become an octogenarian, you find yourself dealing with your memories and your mortality.
    Jim Stovall  --  The Ultimate Gift
  • I did not go over to speak to him: he would have been alarmed by the sight of me, looming out of the darkness in my rubber boots and nightgown like some crazed octogenarian stalker.
    Margaret Atwood  --  The Blind Assassin
  • The octogenarian raised his hands to his temples two or three times with an expression of anguish, recoiled tottering, and fell back into an arm-chair, pulseless, voiceless, tearless, with quivering head and lips which moved with a stupid air, with nothing in his eyes and nothing any longer in his heart except a gloomy and profound something which resembled night.
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables
  • ...who best understood "proportioned politeness," the Comte d'Am, the kindly man with the amiable chin, and the Chevalier de Port-de-Guy, a pillar of the library of the Louvre, called the King's cabinet, M. de Port-de-Guy, bald, and rather aged than old, was wont to relate that in 1793, at the age of sixteen, he had been put in the galleys as refractory and chained with an octogenarian, the Bishop of Mirepoix, also refractory, but as a priest, while he was so in the capacity of a soldier.
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables
  • As he was acquainted with the peaceful and more than timid habits of the old beadle-book-collector, and was amazed at the sight of him in the midst of that uproar, a couple of paces from the cavalry charges, almost in the midst of a fusillade, hatless in the rain, and strolling about among the bullets, he had accosted him, and the following dialogue had been exchanged between the rioter of fire and the octogenarian:— "M.
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables

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