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interrogatory

used in a sentence
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Definition law:  a formal question submitted in writing which must be answered
  • She said that in a sworn interrogatory statement.
  • This question Isabel forbore to answer, as it exceeded the little interrogatory to which she had deemed it necessary to submit on her arrival.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volumes 1 & 2
  • This question Isabel forbore to answer, as it exceeded the little interrogatory to which she had deemed it necessary to submit on her arrival.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volume 2
  • This unexpected testimony from the archer re-encouraged the recluse, whom this interrogatory was forcing to cross an abyss on the edge of a knife.
    Victor Hugo  --  The Hunchback of Notre Dame
  • He is watching us, his eyes interrogatory, intent, and sad.
    William Faulkner  --  As I Lay Dying
  • The reader will at once perceive, that it was to this chronicle that Benjamin pointed, instead of directly answering the sheriff's interrogatory.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Pioneers
  • And if this is some kind of amateurish interrogatory, Soviet style, practice on someone else.
    Robert Ludlum  --  The Bourne Ultimatum
  • After each of these interrogatories, she has inclined her head.
    Charles Dickens  --  Bleak House
  • Venerable trapper, our communications have a recent origin, or thy interrogatory might have a tendency to embroil us in angry disputation.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Prairie
  • Finding the Colonel's French to be of a severely limited description, Poirot conducted his interrogatory in English.
    Agatha Christie  --  Murder On The Orient Express
  • A SUCCESSFUL INTERROGATORY.
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables
  • As the quickest witted, Hist was the first with her interrogatories.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Deerslayer
  • Bonacieux recognized in these papers his interrogatories of the Bastille.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Three Musketeers
  • The profundity of his remarks and interrogatories astonished his old grandfather, who perfectly bored the club at the tavern with stories about the little lad's learning and genius.
    William Makepeace Thackeray  --  Vanity Fair
  • Duncan affected not to comprehend the meaning of their repeated and violent interrogatories, while his companion was spared the effort of a similar deception by his ignorance of French.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Last of the Mohicans
  • And our opponent's counsel will answer with inordinate demands for all our files and seek endless interrogatories in order to enmesh our client in a hopeless tangle of red tape, It is simply war, and you know the quality that applies to that and love.
    Malcolm Gladwell  --  Outliers
  • Thereupon, as M. Richard was on the point of bursting out, M. Moncharmin interfered and conducted the interrogatory, whence it appeared that Mme. Giry thought it quite natural that a voice should be heard to say that a box was taken, when there was nobody in the box.
    Gaston Leroux  --  The Phantom of the Opera
  • As this remark, a sort of half interrogatory, was made, Pathfinder looked behind him; and, though the most partial friend could scarcely term his sunburnt and hard features handsome, even Mabel thought his smile attractive, by its simple ingenuousness and the uprightness that beamed in every lineament of his honest countenance.
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Pathfinder
  • Nicholas understood the tone of triumph in which this interrogatory was put; but remembering the necessity of supporting his assumed character, produced a scrap of paper purporting to contain a list of some subjects for drawings which his employer desired to have executed; and with which he had prepared himself in case of any such contingency.
    Charles Dickens  --  Nicholas Nickleby
  • A pair of slipshod feet shuffled, hastily, across the bare floor of the room, as this interrogatory was put; and there issued, from a door on the right hand; first, a feeble candle: and next, the form of the same individual who has been heretofore described as labouring under the infirmity of speaking through his nose, and officiating as waiter at the public-house on Saffron Hill.
    Charles Dickens  --  Oliver Twist

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