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vocabulary
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debonair

used in a sentence
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Definition having a sophisticated charm (typically said of a man)
  • handsome and debonair
  • Love thy neighbor - and if he happens to be tall, debonair and devastating, it will be that much easier.
    Mae West
  • His voice trembled, toppled, disappeared, as though strangled by the intensity of his own loathing for the debonair, gum-chewing defendants.
    Truman Capote  --  In Cold Blood
  • Luc, so suave and debonair, so steady and strong.
    Sarah Dessen  --  This Lullaby
  • His inexplicable debts were a byword in his circle; he was a debonair young man.
    James Joyce  --  Dubliners
  • His small mustache was trimmed and looked as debonair as ever.
    Betty Smith  --  A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
  • They are no longer so spruce or so debonair.
    Virginia Woolf  --  The Waves
  • It is even difficult to imagine a boy who would do it, unless you realize from the start that Lancelot was not romantic and debonair.
    T. H. White  --  The Once and Future King
  • He was little changed, still care-free and debonair as of old, with the same habit of treating all things lightly.
    Agatha Christie  --  Early Cases Of Hercule Poirot
  • It was a handsome debonair, bright-eyed cowboy that came tramping into Madeline's presence.
    Zane Grey  --  The Light of Western Stars
  • Prof came out and, while did not look his most debonair, was neat and clean, hair combed, dimples back and happy sparkle in eye—fake cataract gone.
    Robert A. Heinlein  --  The Moon is a Harsh Mistress
  • I was debonair, a ladies' man, a young Frank Sinatra.
    Nicholas Sparks  --  The Longest Ride
  • I was thinking more like debonair.
    Stephenie Meyer  --  Breaking Dawn
  • So we licked spoons and I was in general sociable, helpful, debonair, and thought of the two colors of my silk suspenders and the fit of my shirt, Simon's gifts.
    Saul Bellow  --  The Adventures of Augie March
  • And thus he went along, full of that debonair majesty that is given by the consciousness of great talent, of fortune, and of forty years of a labourious and irreproachable life.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
  • Blessed with a rakish smile and a debonair gaze, he is handsome, brilliant, witty, charismatic, tender, and able to bed almost any woman he wants—and he has bedded quite a few.
    Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Lincoln
  • And, waking, I beheld her there Sea-dreaming in the moted air, A siren lithe and debonair, With wristlets woven of scarlet weeds, And oblong lucent amber beads Of sea-kelp shining in her hair.
    Lew Wallace  --  Ben Hur
  • Simultaneously Amory classed him with the crowd, and he seemed no longer Sloane of the debonair humor and the happy personality, but only one of the evil faces that whirled along the turbid stream.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald  --  This Side of Paradise
  • Then he would kiss me, button up his frock coat, give his top hat a promise with the velvet glove and trot off, handsome, debonair, in his ribbed socks and very small well polished shoes to the Treasury.
    Virginia Woolf  --  A Sketch of the Past
  • But the truth was, Mama looked old, even older than Papa with his dapper new hat and his linen guayaberas and his high black boots, and a debonair cane that seemed more a self-important prop than a walking aid.
    Julia Alvarez  --  In the Time of the Butterflies

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