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vocabulary
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agitate

used in a sentence
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Definition to stir up or shake — emotionally (as when people are angered or upset) or physically (as when a washing machine cleans clothes)
  • We are agitating public unrest, so there will be a cry for change.
agitating = stirring up emotions to increase unrest
  • The washing machine cleans by agitating.
  • agitating = stirring up or shaking
  • She gets agitated whenever the topic comes up.
  • agitated = emotionally disturbed
  • I tried to hide my growing agitation.
  • agitation = emotional unrest
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • In spite of his apparent outward composure, he was evidently in a state of great mental agitation.
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky  --  The Idiot
  • agitation = a non-calm feeling
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • From the time that Garrison, Lovejoy, and others began to agitate for freedom, the slaves throughout the South kept in close touch with the progress of the movement.
    Booker T. Washington  --  Up From Slavery: An Autobiography
  • agitate = stir up (public demand)
  • For a week Martin's life had all the regularity of an escaped soldier in the enemy's country, with the same agitation
    Sinclair Lewis  --  Arrowsmith
  • agitation = anxiety (nervousness and worry)
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Occasionally he peers closely at a tattoo, increasing Lale's and Leon's agitation.
    Heather Morris  --  The Tattooist of Auschwitz
  • agitation = anxiety (nervousness and worry)
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • The noise in this room was perfectly tumultuous, for there were more children there, than Scrooge in his agitated state of mind could count;
    Charles Dickens  --  A Christmas Carol
  • agitated = emotionally upset
  • Anger agitates, while whistling melts a bee's temper.
    Sue Monk Kidd  --  The Secret Life of Bees
  • agitates = upsets
  • Only the young recruits are agitated.
    Erich Maria Remarque  --  All Quiet on the Western Front
  • agitated = nervous
  • Eddie was so white, when he got agitated, little rosebuds bloomed on his face, then closed again like tiny fists.
    Victor Martinez  --  Parrot in the Oven
  • agitated = emotionally upset (stirred up)
  • Every moment rather brought fresh agitation.
    Jane Austen  --  Persuasion
  • agitation = emotional unrest
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • The agitation with which he spoke again was not quite unmixed with anger.
    George Eliot  --  Silas Marner
  • agitation = emotional unrest
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • It took them days to get the story properly blown up and themselves agitated and then to calm down and assess the situation.
    Toni Morrison  --  Beloved
  • agitated = stirred up (excited)
  • PISCHIN. [Agitated] What? Why to town?
    Anton Chekhov  --  The Cherry Orchard
  • agitated = emotionally upset
  • Under the stars of the blue summer night he walked agitatedly across the yard to the gate under the poplars.
    Lucy Maud Montgomery  --  Anne Of Green Gables
  • agitatedly = without calmness
  • Uncle Shepsel became more and more agitated.
    Jerry Spinelli  --  Milkweed
  • agitated = upset
  • ...she had passed a night of extreme unrest, a night agitated above all by fears that...
    Henry James  --  The Turn of the Screw
  • agitated = disturbed
  • More than once the agitation into which these reflections threw me made my friends dread a dangerous relapse.
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
agitation = anxiety
(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)

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