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warrant

used in a sentence
3 meanings
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1  —as in:
has a warrant to...
Definition a document (granting the right to do something)
for example:
  • a document signed by a judge giving police the right to search a home
  • a document signed by a judge giving police the right to arrest someone
  • a document giving someone the right to buy stock shares at a given price by a given date
  • a voucher documenting the right to receive payment
  • Do you have a search warrant?
warrant = document giving the right to do the thing just mentioned
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • The judge signed an arrest warrant.
  • warrant = document giving the right to do the thing just mentioned
  • Before you sign my death-warrant, be sure that you are yourself safe.
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
  • warrant = a document granting the right to do something
  • Mr. Cheever, have warrants drawn for all of these—arrest for examination.
    Arthur Miller  --  The Crucible
  • warrants = documents authorizing something
  • I think the judge may issue a warrant on this.
    Delia Owens  --  Where the Crawdads Sing
  • warrant = a document granting the right to do something
  • While Brother Gerald was explaining how he couldn't sign the warrant papers seeing as how Rosaleen was nearly deaf, I started for the door.
    Sue Monk Kidd  --  The Secret Life of Bees
  • warrant = document authorizing arrest
  • It doesn't matter; we have a search warrant.
    Delia Owens  --  Where the Crawdads Sing
  • warrant = a document granting the right to do something
  • With a warrant we can search her place for any trace of red fibers that match those found on Chase's clothes.
    Delia Owens  --  Where the Crawdads Sing
  • warrant = a document granting the right to do something
  • PROCTOR, suddenly snatching the warrant out of Cheever's hands: Out with you.
    Arthur Miller  --  The Crucible
  • warrant = document authorizing arrest
  • This warrant's vengeance!
    Arthur Miller  --  The Crucible
warrant = document authorizing arrest

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —as in:
serious enough to warrant surgery
Definition to justify (make an action reasonable or necessary)
  • The company's reputation for high-quality products is no longer warranted.
warranted = justified (reasonable)
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • She believes the invasion of privacy is warranted to assist in the battle against terrorists.
  • warranted = justified (reasonable)
  • Did you not think the nature of her injuries warranted immediate medical attention?
    Harper Lee  --  To Kill a Mockingbird
  • warranted = justified
  • Henry Crawford was at Mansfield Park again the next morning, and at an earlier hour than common visiting warrants.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • warrants = makes reasonable
  • Although I think hitting a child would be valid grounds for expulsion in other schools, I agree such extreme measures aren't warranted here.
    R.J. Palacio  --  Wonder
  • warranted = justified
  • The attack was so inconsequential, according to the king, that it barely warranted notice.
    Kiera Cass  --  The Selection
  • warranted = justified or deserved
  • "As far as I am concerned," he said, "there's not enough evidence to warrant that conclusion."
    Daniel Keyes  --  Flowers for Algernon — Novel
  • warrant = justify
  • But this is a snobbish objection and not at all warranted by the facts.
    Arthur Miller  --  The Crucible
  • warranted = justified
  • Her ideas are not higher than her own fortune may warrant, but they are beyond what our incomes united could authorise.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • warrant = make reasonable
  • There was, indeed, so deep a blush over Fanny's face at that moment as might warrant strong suspicion in a predisposed mind.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
warrant = make reasonable

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
3  —as in:
I warrant it
Definition to promise, guarantee, or indicate certainty of something

(seldom used today, but common in classic literature)
  • I warrant the material is original.
warrant = promise
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • It will rain tonight. I warrant it.
  • warrant = am certain of
  • I warrant her a woman of good character.
  • warrant = am certain
  • The company warrants their product.
  • warrants = guarantees
  • I'll warrant him as gentle as a lamb.
    William Shakespeare  --  Romeo and Juliet
  • warrant = guarantee (assure you)
  • She confided to me that she has got her death warrant. Her doctor told her that within a few months, at most, she must die, for her heart is weakening.
    Bram Stoker  --  Dracula
  • warrant = guarantee
  • I cannot swim a stroke, nor could anyone else on this ship, I warrant, except Nat who was born on the water.
    Elizabeth George Speare  --  The Witch of Blackbird Pond
  • warrant = guarantee (assure you)
  • Who, now, that saw him pass in the procession, would think how little while it is since he went forth out of his study—chewing a Hebrew text of Scripture in his mouth, I warrant—to take an airing in the forest!
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  The Scarlet Letter
  • warrant = assure you
  • We do know in part what Mr. Ewell did: he did what any God-fearing, persevering, respectable white man would do under the circumstances— he swore out a warrant, no doubt signing it with his left hand, and Tom Robinson now sits before you, having taken the oath with the only good hand he possesses his right hand.
    Harper Lee  --  To Kill a Mockingbird
  • warrant = document stating that something happened
  • The girl will be safe with me, that I warrant.
    Elizabeth George Speare  --  The Witch of Blackbird Pond
warrant = guarantee (assure you)

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
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