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vocabulary
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unsavory

used in a sentence
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Definition unpleasant or distasteful — as from offensive morality or bad taste
  • She has an unsavory reputation.
unsavory = unpleasant
  • I hate to talk about such an unsavory scandal.
  • unsavory = unpleasant
  • He wasn't merely an unsavory drunken brute, but an unsavory, clever drunken brute.
    Lemony Snicket  --  The Bad Beginning
  • unsavory = unpleasant or distasteful — as from offensive morality or bad taste
  • The men were furious at having been tricked into behaving politely to this insignificant fellow with the unsavoury reputation and the heretical opinions.
    Aldous Huxley  --  Brave New World
  • unsavoury = unpleasant and distasteful
    (editor's note:  This is a British spelling. Americans use unsavory.)
  • The situation was unsavory to say the least.
    Markus Zusak  --  The Book Thief
  • unsavory = unpleasant
  • To avoid being rolled by the unsavory characters who rule the streets and freeway overpasses where he slept, he learned to bury what money he had before entering a city, then recover it on the way out of town.
    Jon Krakauer  --  Into the Wild
  • unsavory = unpleasant
  • — Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!
    William Shakespeare  --  Romeo and Juliet
  • unsavoury = unpleasant
    (editor's note:  This is a British spelling. Americans use unsavory.)
  • "That's the place?" General Doppelganger asked. "It looks more than a bit...unsavory."
    Frank Beddor  --  The Looking Glass Wars
  • unsavory = unpleasant (distasteful)
  • He wasn't merely an unsavory drunken brute, but an unsavory, clever drunken brute.
    Lemony Snicket  --  The Bad Beginning
  • unsavory = unpleasant
  • ...he would sell this information to certain unsavory individuals.
    Frank Beddor  --  The Looking Glass Wars
  • unsavory = morally offensive
  • In the lift, on their way up to the changing rooms, Henry Foster and the Assistant Director of Predestination rather pointedly turned their backs on Bernard Marx from the Psychology Bureau: averted themselves from that unsavoury reputation.
    Aldous Huxley  --  Brave New World
  • unsavoury = unpleasant and distasteful
    (editor's note:  This is a British spelling. Americans use unsavory.)
  • Doomed by his own choice, therefore, as Mr. Dimmesdale so evidently was, to eat his unsavoury morsel always at another's board, and endure the life-long chill which must be his lot who seeks to warm himself only at another's fireside, it truly seemed that this sagacious, experienced, benevolent old physician, with his concord of paternal and reverential love for the young pastor, was the very man, of all mankind, to be constantly within reach of his voice.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  The Scarlet Letter
  • unsavoury = unpleasant and distasteful
    (editor's note:  This is a British spelling. Americans use unsavory.)
  • However, we shall hear more than enough at the inquest on such unsavoury topics.
    E.M. Forster  --  Howards End
  • (editor's note:  This is a British spelling. Americans use unsavory.)
  • Holmes knew she had an unsavory associate named "Hatch."
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • Her characterization of Uncle Pio flatly contradicted the stores of unsavory testimonies that he had acquired elsewhere.
    Thornton Wilder  --  The Bridge of San Luis Rey
  • Ben considers me good, and I don't disturb this faith: he doesn't need my more unsavory truths.
    Margaret Atwood  --  Cat's Eye
  • If you are a professor, you have to deal with some pretty unsavory characters and some questionable works.
    Thomas C. Foster  --  How to Read Literature Like a Professor
  • I'd shoot him if he tried anything unsavory.
    Terry Pratchett  --  Nation
  • He was evidently quite contented, and awaited evens with perfect calm; he even seemed to enjoy Brogard's unsavoury fare.
    Baroness Orczy  --  The Scarlet Pimpernel
  • (editor's note:  This is a British spelling. Americans use unsavory.)
  • These youngsters, following the lead of Rhett Butler, went hand in hand with the Carpetbaggers in money-making schemes of unsavory kinds.
    Margaret Mitchell  --  Gone with the Wind

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