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transgress

used in a sentence
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Definition to violate a rule, promise, or social norm

Much more rarely (and archaically), transgress can mean:  "spread over land, especially along a subsiding shoreline" as in "The sea transgresses along the West coast of the island."
  • Her actions transgressed the boundaries of acceptable behavior.
transgressed = violated (a rule, promise, or social norm)
  • The use of innocents as human shields transgresses "the laws of war."
  • transgresses = violates
  • Laws are sand, customs are rock. Laws can be evaded and punishment escaped but an openly transgressed custom brings sure punishment.
    Mark Twain
  • His transgressions were small ones, always: shoes on the wrong feet, schoolwork misplaced, failure to study adequately for a quiz.
    Lois Lowry  --  The Giver
  • transgressions = breaking of rules
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in discussions from discuss, explosions from explode, and revisions from revise.)
  • You never knew when the wrong word would turn a quiet dinner into a terrible fight, or when a minor childhood transgression would send a plate or book flying across the room.
    J.D. Vance  --  Hillbilly Elegy
  • transgression = rule violation
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • our manifold transgressions of Thy holy laws,
    Edward E. Hale  --  The Man Without a Country
  • transgressions = violations
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in discussions from discuss, explosions from explode, and revisions from revise.)
  • For our gift is greater than our transgression.
    Ayn Rand  --  Anthem
  • transgression = breaking of rules
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • Wilt thou make a trust a transgression?
    William Shakespeare  --  Much Ado About Nothing
  • transgression = an act in violation of rules, promises, or social norms
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • All these months of not so much as a kiss between us, I had assumed his transgressions with the women of the night had satisfied whatever urges a man like John Rimbauer has-substantial urges indeed.
    Stephen King  --  Rose Red
  • transgressions = acts that violate rules, promises, or social norms
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in discussions from discuss, explosions from explode, and revisions from revise.)
  • Jonas has, like all of us, committed minor transgressions.
    Lois Lowry  --  The Giver
  • transgressions = rule violations
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in discussions from discuss, explosions from explode, and revisions from revise.)
  • The rules say that if there's a third transgression, he simply has to be released.
    Lois Lowry  --  The Giver
  • transgression = breaking of rules
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • A major transgression.
    Lois Lowry  --  The Giver
  • transgression = rule violation
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • One of our neighbors would walk in and yell at me for the smallest of transgressions—not smiling at her, or bagging the groceries too heavy one day or too light the next.
    J.D. Vance  --  Hillbilly Elegy
  • transgressions = breaking of rules
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in discussions from discuss, explosions from explode, and revisions from revise.)
  • She obeyed his directions very punctually: perhaps she had no temptation to transgress.
    Bronte, Emily  --  Wuthering Heights
  • Here and there a restriction annoyed her particularly, and she would transgress it, and perhaps be sorry that she had done so.
    Forster, E. M.  --  A Room With A View
  • Nevertheless I had to come, for none of us other gods can cross Jove, nor transgress his orders.
    Homer  --  The Odyssey
  • In cases of heinous transgression and refusal to submit to correction, a Christian could be officially excommunicated from the Church and denied its sacraments and ministrations.
    Dictionary of the History of Ideas  --  http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/cgi-local/DHI/dhi.cgi?id=dv1-50 (retrieved 05/20/06)
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • Sin is not viewed by the Orthodox as a stain on the soul that needs to be wiped out, or a legal transgression that must be set right by a punitive sentence, but rather as a mistake made by the individual with the opportunity for spiritual growth and development.
    Eastern Orthodox Church - Wikipedia  --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_Orthodoxy (retrieved 05/20/06)
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • Is it better to drive a fellow-creature to despair than to transgress a mere human law, no man being injured by the breach?
    Bronte, Charlotte  --  Jane Eyre
  • The Furies they said are attendants on justice, and if the sun in heaven should transgress his path they would punish him.
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo  --  Essays, First Series

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