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strata

used in a sentence
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Definition layers

or:

levels, classes, or groups into which people or other things are divided
  • The Grand Canyon has many exposed rock strata ranging from 200 million to 2 billion years old.
strata = layers
  • The candidate reaches across social strata — from millionaires to the unemployed.
  • strata = classes or groups
  • She is investigating the rock strata to better understand the Antarctic ice sheet.
  • strata = layers
  • I stopped for a long time to let my nerves settle, then leaned back from my tools and stared up at the face above, searching for a hint of solid ice, for some variation in the underlying rock strata, for anything that would allow passage over the frosted slabs.
    Jon Krakauer  --  Into the Wild
  • strata = layers
  • She set down a bowl of tortilla chips and a casserole dish filled with elaborate dip in multicolored strata, like sedimentary rock.
    Rick Riordan  --  The Hidden Oracle
  • strata = layers
  • For another thing, he didn't have any idea how to "name three sedimentary strata you observe" or "describe two examples of erosion."
    Rick Riordan  --  The Lost Hero
  • strata = layers
  • They were men from all across the social strata who had been trained by American World War II and Korea veterans—and those hardened U.S. vets were impressed by what they saw.
    Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard  --  Killing Kennedy
  • strata = classes or groups
  • I don't mean that he had traded on his phantom millions, but he had deliberately given Daisy a sense of security; he let her believe that he was a person from much the same stratum as herself — that he was fully able to take care of her.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald  --  The Great Gatsby
  • stratum = class of society
    (editor's note:  Strata, the plural form of this word is used much more commonly than the singular form. Many Latin words that end in "um" are made plural by changing the "um" to "a"—such as stratum to strata, bacterium to bacteria, and millennium to millennia. In modern writing, changing the "um" to "ums" is also accepted for many Latin words ending in um, but not for any of those listed above.)
  • Just beneath the crust lay a twenty-foot stratum of the same quicksand Chicago builders always confronted, only now it was ice cold and a torment to workers.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • stratum = layer
    (editor's note:  Strata, the plural form of this word is used much more commonly than the singular form. Many Latin words that end in "um" are made plural by changing the "um" to "a"—such as stratum to strata, bacterium to bacteria, and millennium to millennia. In modern writing, changing the "um" to "ums" is also accepted for many Latin words ending in um, but not for any of those listed above.)
  • The entire operation was not unlike the digging of a trench in one's yard. The woman on the bed was no more than a hard stratum of marble they had reached.
    Ray Bradbury  --  Fahrenheit 451
  • stratum = layer
    (editor's note:  Strata, the plural form of this word is used much more commonly than the singular form. Many Latin words that end in "um" are made plural by changing the "um" to "a"—such as stratum to strata, bacterium to bacteria, and millennium to millennia. In modern writing, changing the "um" to "ums" is also accepted for many Latin words ending in um, but not for any of those listed above.)
  • But this was concrete evidence; it was a fragment of the abolished past, like a fossil bone which turns up in the wrong stratum and destroys a geological theory.
    George Orwell  --  1984
  • stratum = layer
    (editor's note:  Strata, the plural form of this word is used much more commonly than the singular form. Many Latin words that end in "um" are made plural by changing the "um" to "a"—such as stratum to strata, bacterium to bacteria, and millennium to millennia. In modern writing, changing the "um" to "ums" is also accepted for many Latin words ending in um, but not for any of those listed above.)
  • Then came a few guests belonging to a lower stratum of society—people who, like the Epanchins themselves, moved only occasionally in this exalted sphere.
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky  --  The Idiot
  • stratum = social class
    (editor's note:  Strata, the plural form of this word is used much more commonly than the singular form. Many Latin words that end in "um" are made plural by changing the "um" to "a"—such as stratum to strata, bacterium to bacteria, and millennium to millennia. In modern writing, changing the "um" to "ums" is also accepted for many Latin words ending in um, but not for any of those listed above.)
  • And he remembered sunrise here on Arrakis—colored strata of the Shield Wall mellowed by dust haze.
    Frank Herbert  --  Dune
  • strata = layers
  • Specimens associated with Morrison formation strata in Colorado, Utah, and Oklahoma.
    Michael Crichton  --  Jurassic Park
  • strata = layers
  • The entire member seems a dense webbed bed of welded sinews; but cut into it, and you find that three distinct strata compose it:—upper, middle, and lower.
    Herman Melville  --  Moby Dick
  • strata = layers
  • They are members of a social stratum which includes welfare mothers, housing project residents, immigrant families, the homeless and unemployed.
    Luis J. Rodriguez  --  Always Running
  • stratum = class
    (editor's note:  Strata, the plural form of this word is used much more commonly than the singular form. Many Latin words that end in "um" are made plural by changing the "um" to "a"—such as stratum to strata, bacterium to bacteria, and millennium to millennia. In modern writing, changing the "um" to "ums" is also accepted for many Latin words ending in um, but not for any of those listed above.)
  • What he was proposing, in effect, was a stratum of artificial bedrock that would also serve as the floor of the basement.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • stratum = layer
    (editor's note:  Strata, the plural form of this word is used much more commonly than the singular form. Many Latin words that end in "um" are made plural by changing the "um" to "a"—such as stratum to strata, bacterium to bacteria, and millennium to millennia. In modern writing, changing the "um" to "ums" is also accepted for many Latin words ending in um, but not for any of those listed above.)
  • Late in the day on their summit push, the two Americans climbed a stratum of steep, crumbly rock-the infamous Yellow Band.
    Jon Krakauer  --  Into Thin Air
  • stratum = layer
    (editor's note:  Strata, the plural form of this word is used much more commonly than the singular form. Many Latin words that end in "um" are made plural by changing the "um" to "a"—such as stratum to strata, bacterium to bacteria, and millennium to millennia. In modern writing, changing the "um" to "ums" is also accepted for many Latin words ending in um, but not for any of those listed above.)
  •   Densities, growth, facades,
      Strata of mountains, soils, rocks, giant trees,
      Far-born, far-dying, living long, to leave,
      Eidolons everlasting.
    Walt Whitman  --  Leaves of Grass
  • strata = layers
  • His tales "The Masque of the Red Death" (1842) and "The Fall of the House of Usher" (1839) both deal with a stratum of society most of us only get to read about: the nobility.
    Thomas C. Foster  --  How to Read Literature Like a Professor
stratum = social class
(editor's note:  Strata, the plural form of this word is used much more commonly than the singular form. Many Latin words that end in "um" are made plural by changing the "um" to "a"—such as stratum to strata, bacterium to bacteria, and millennium to millennia. In modern writing, changing the "um" to "ums" is also accepted for many Latin words ending in um, but not for any of those listed above.)

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