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slander

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Definition words falsely spoken that damage the reputation of another
  • In the United States, it is extremely difficult for someone famous to win a slander lawsuit—almost no matter what is said.
slander = falsely say something that damages the reputation of another; or the thing said
  • Check your sources or you could be sued for slander.
  • slander = falsely say something that damages the reputation of another; or the thing said
  • No, 'tis slander, Whose edge is sharper than the sword
    William Shakespeare
  • Young fellow, you'd better get your facts straight before making such outrageous and slanderous charges.
    Carl Hiassen  --  Hoot
  • slanderous = of words falsely spoken that damage the reputation of another
  • she is wronged, she is slandered, she is undone.
    William Shakespeare  --  Much Ado About Nothing
  • slandered = things falsely said that damaged the reputation of another
  • Do not buy this book! Ladies of Jackson, do not support this slander...
    Kathryn Stockett  --  The Help
  • slander = falsely say something that damages the reputation of another; or the thing said
  • Just recall to your mind what these malicious creatures wrote in the papers about papa, and how horribly they slandered him.
    Henrik Ibsen  --  A Doll's House
  • slandered = falsely said things that damaged the reputation of another
  • did you set these women on to slander Lord Angelo?
    William Shakespeare  --  Measure for Measure
  • slander = lie to damage the reputation of
  • In such a night
    Did pretty Jessica, like a little shrew,
    Slander her love, and he forgave it her.
    William Shakespeare  --  The Merchant of Venice
  • slander = tell lies that damaged
  • It's not about punish the doctors or slander the hospital.
    Rebecca Skloot  --  The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
  • slander = tell lies that damage the reputation of
  • my reputation stain'd With Tybalt's slander,
    William Shakespeare  --  Romeo and Juliet
  • slander = damaging lies
  • For slander lives upon succession
    William Shakespeare  --  The Comedy of Errors
  • slander = falsely say something that damages the reputation of another; or the thing said
  • You cannot slander human nature; it is worse than words can paint it.
    Charles Haddon Spurgeon
  • Does any one dare to slander me?
    Dumas, Alexandre  --  The Count of Monte Cristo
  • And he related how a peasant had stolen some flour from the miller, and when the miller told him of it, had lodged a complaint for slander.
    Tolstoy, Leo  --  Anna Karenina
  • Change slander to remorse.
    Shakespeare, William  --  Much Ado about Nothing
  • You slander the young lady.
    Dickens, Charles  --  Our Mutual Friend
  • Truth is generally the best vindication against slander.
    Abraham Lincoln
  • Some idle slander somebody has been inventing, I suppose.
    Bronte, Anne  --  The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
  • Is it an objection that I have triumphantly defended myself against slander and vindicated my purity in a court of justice?
    Hawthorne, Nathaniel  --  Mosses From An Old Manse and other stories

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