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vocabulary
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recuperate

used in a sentence
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Definition to regain good health or strength
  • The patient is recuperating
recuperating = regaining health or strength
  • The company managed to recuperate
  • So far, it appears that the H1N1 season will not cause wide-scale shutdowns of schools or businesses. But to control the spread of the disease, the CDC is advising that schools use separate rooms where sick students can wait until they go home to recuperate.
    Alice Park  --  Time, 2009  --  http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1924276_1924300_1924296,00.html (retrieved 01/18/10)
  • "I'm still recuperating," I told her.
    J.D. Salinger  --  The Catcher in the Rye
  • recuperating = regaining health or strength
  • We want sleep, both you and I, and rest to recuperate.
    Bram Stoker  --  Dracula
  • recuperate = to regain good health or strength
  • Have you recuperated from that court ordeal yet?
    Sharon M. Draper  --  Tears of a Tiger
  • recuperated = regained strength
  • With his usual recuperative energy, he went on, "Come."
    Bram Stoker  --  Dracula
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • It is wonderful, however, what intellectual recuperative power lunatics have, for within a few minutes he stood up quite calmly and looked around him.
    Bram Stoker  --  Dracula
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • Miro had kept moving through the downpour, knowing he could not indulge in the luxury of rest or recuperation.
    Robert Cormier  --  After the First Death
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • He stroked the cat's neck, then released it back to its own world where it could further recuperate.
    R.A. Salvatore  --  The Crystal Shard
  • Only men, Mahtob, and me, recuperating around the fire.
    Betty Mahmoody  --  Not Without My Daughter
  • There I would recuperate, and this time I would not rush things.
    Roger Zelazny  --  Nine Princes in Amber
  • "Recuperating, yes," Bellamy said.
    Dan Brown  --  The Lost Symbol
  • Recuperation postponed my arrival in New Orleans.
    Peter Jenkins  --  A Walk Across America
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • David lay in the healing ward, alive but far too weak, to conjure his veil anew while he recuperated under the watchful eyes of the Moomenhovens.
    Henry H. Neff  --  The Second Siege
  • All Georgia wanted was to be let alone so the state could recuperate.
    Margaret Mitchell  --  Gone with the Wind
  • I spent several days in hospital recuperating from the surgery.
    Nelson Mandela  --  Long Walk to Freedom
  • The Negroes and the "toughs" from the Levee did not want to work, and every few minutes some of them would feel obliged to retire and recuperate.
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • Zahid Khan was in hospital for twelve days, then at home recuperating for a month after having plastic surgery to repair his nose.
    Malala Yousafzai  --  I Am Malala
  • Too it was important that he should have time for physical recuperation.
    Stephen Crane  --  The Red Badge of Courage
(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)

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