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vocabulary
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recluse

used in a sentence
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Definition someone withdrawn from society (living alone and avoiding contact)

Occasionally, recluse may refer to a venomous spider typically referred to as the brown recluse.
  • He became a recluse after his wife passed away.
recluse = someone withdrawn from society (living alone and avoiding contact with others)
  • She lives an unsocial reclusive life.
  • reclusive = withdrawn from society (avoiding contact with others)
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • Howard Hughes became an eccentric recluse.
  • recluse = someone withdrawn from society (living alone and avoiding contact)
  • A few friends felt at liberty to visit the recluse, and were kindly welcomed, but he himself sought no one.
    Melville, Herman  --  Typee
  • I had lived a placid, uneventful, sedentary existence all my days—the life of a scholar and a recluse on an assured and comfortable income.
    London, Jack  --  The Sea Wolf
  • The affable man gradually turned into a grouchy, taciturn recluse.
    Mina Baites  --  The Silver Music Box
  • recluse = someone withdrawn from society (living alone and avoiding contact)
  • Her reclusiveness proved no barrier to the county's continued efforts to market her literary classic—or to market itself by using the book's celebrity.
    Bryan Stevenson  --  Just Mercy
  • reclusiveness = state of living alone and avoiding contact with others
    (Editor's note:  The suffix "-ness" converts an adjective to a noun that means the quality of. This is the same pattern you see in words like darkness, kindness, and coolness.)
  • Even though McCandless rebuffed Tracy's advances, Burres makes it clear that he was no recluse: "He had agood time when he was around people, areal good time."
    Jon Krakauer  --  Into the Wild
  • recluse = someone withdrawn from society (living alone and avoiding contact)
  • AIA was the only book Peter Van Houten had written, and all anyone seemed to know about him was that after the book came out he moved from the United States to the Netherlands and became kind of reclusive.
    John Green  --  The Fault in Our Stars
  • reclusive = withdrawn from others
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • I sometimes felt a twinge of remorse, when passing by the old place, at ever having taken part in what must have been sheer torment to Arthur Radley—what reasonable recluse wants children peeping through his shutters, delivering greetings on the end of a fishing-pole, wandering in his collards at night?
    Harper Lee  --  To Kill a Mockingbird
  • recluse = person who avoids contact with others
  • You said he is a recluse?
    John Green  --  The Fault in Our Stars
  • recluse = someone withdrawn from society (living alone and avoiding contact)
  • Wuthering Heights and Mr. Heathcliff did not exist for her: she was a perfect recluse; and, apparently, perfectly contented.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • recluse = someone withdrawn from society (living alone and avoiding contact)
  • But through the remainder of Hester's life there were indications that the recluse of the scarlet letter was the object of love and interest with some inhabitant of another land.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  The Scarlet Letter
  • recluse = someone withdrawn from society (living alone and avoiding contact)
  • Their leader was a mysterious, illiterate, one-eyed recluse named Mullah Omar, who, Rasheed said with some amusement, called himself Ameer-ul-Mumineen, Leader of the Faithful.
    Khaled Hosseini  --  A Thousand Splendid Suns
  • recluse = someone withdrawn from society (living alone and avoiding contact)
  • In a by-yard, there was a wilderness of empty casks, which had a certain sour remembrance of better days lingering about them; but it was too sour to be accepted as a sample of the beer that was gone,—and in this respect I remember those recluses as being like most others.
    Charles Dickens  --  Great Expectations
  • recluses = people withdrawn from society (living alone and avoiding contact)
  • He went to call indeed; but he was perhaps relieved to be denied admittance; perhaps, in his heart, he preferred to speak with Poole upon the doorstep and surrounded by the air and sounds of the open city, rather than to be admitted into that house of voluntary bondage, and to sit and speak with its inscrutable recluse.
    Robert Louis Stevenson  --  Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
  • recluse = person withdrawn from society (living alone and avoiding contact)
  • The young girl had recognized the spiteful recluse.
    Victor Hugo  --  The Hunchback of Notre Dame
  • recluse = a person who has withdrawn from society (avoids contact with others)
  • An eccentric recluse who spends most of his time shooting wild game.
    Alice Walker  --  The Color Purple
  • recluse = someone withdrawn from society (living alone and avoiding contact)
  • He stopped drinking, became more of a recluse than ever, and rode with cold and ruthless fury.
    Hal Borland  --  When the Legends Die
  • recluse = someone withdrawn from society (living alone and avoiding contact)
  • I became more and more of a recluse, avoiding our old haunts for fear of running into him.
    Julia Alvarez  --  How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents
recluse = someone withdrawn from society (living alone and avoiding contact)

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