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prodigious
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Definition enormous; or far beyond what is usual in magnitude or degree
  • As a child, Mozart had a prodigious talent.
prodigious = enormous
  • It is the most prodigious project of her career so far.
  • prodigious = enormous
  • a prodigious storm
  • This is a gigantic city, after all, and it produces a prodigious volume of garbage.
    Haruki Murakami  --  After Dark
  • prodigious = enormous
  • Stanley [prodigiously elated]:
    Tennessee Williams  --  A Streetcar Named Desire
  • prodigiously = far beyond what is usual in magnitude or degree
  • And so let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire.
    Martin Luther King, Jr.  --  I Have a Dream
  • prodigious = enormous
  • There is a prodigious stench in this place.
    Arthur Miller  --  The Crucible
  • prodigious = enormous; or far beyond what is usual in magnitude or degree
  • "Yeah, the circle was prodigious," Erin said.
    P.C. Cast & Kristin Cast  --  Marked
  • prodigious = enormous
  • Father Zeus, you send mankind prodigious follies.
    Homer  --  The Iliad
  • prodigious = enormous (far beyond what is usual in magnitude)
  • the prodigious power which had been exerted
    Edgar Allan Poe  --  The Murders in the Rue Morgue
  • prodigious = enormous; or far beyond what is usual in magnitude or degree
  • She was a witch, as Harry knew, with prodigious skill and no conscience.
    J.K. Rowling  --  Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
  • prodigious = enormous; or far beyond what is usual in magnitude or degree
  • the easiest and the quickest way to get the makings of the vicarage to the village was to hire a forestry barge at a prodigious thirty dollars a day.
    Margaret Craven  --  I Heard the Owl Call My Name
  • prodigious = enormous
  • the prodigious quantity of snow
    Daniel Defoe  --  Robinson Crusoe
  • prodigious = large amount (far beyond what is usual)
  • In the close quarters of an American nuclear family, their mother's prodigious energy was becoming a real drain on their self-determination.
    Julia Alvarez  --  How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents
  • prodigious = far beyond what is usual
  • in the middle of a prodigiously tough snore
    Charles Dickens  --  A Christmas Carol
  • prodigiously = far beyond what is usual in magnitude or degree
  • They were conducted to the platform by Buckstone ... and were delivered to the chairman in the midst of a prodigious explosion of welcome.
    Mark Twain  --  Pudd'nhead Wilson
  • prodigious = enormous; or far beyond the usual amount
  • to write a work of genius is almost always a feat of prodigious difficulty.
    Virginia Woolf  --  A Room of One's Own
  • prodigious = far beyond what is usual in magnitude or degree
  • ...nothing living on it but game birds ... and the gulls which haunted the outlying rocks in a prodigious number.
    Robert Louis Stevenson  --  Kidnapped
  • prodigious = enormous (a very large number)
  • That is the most prodigious girl in this school!
    Homer Hickam  --  October Sky
  • prodigious = fabulous (beyond what is usual)
  • our prodigious experience
    Henry James  --  The Turn of the Screw
prodigious = enormous; or far beyond what is usual in magnitude or degree

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