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officious

used in a sentence
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Definition too eager to tell others what to do — often regarding unimportant matters
  • She plays the role of a well-meaning but officious classmate who thinks she knows what's best for everyone.
officious = too eager to tell others what to do
  • He rushes from office to office making an officious nuisance of himself.
  • officious = too eager to tell others what to do
  • But, however, I soon found it would not do; he was bent upon going, and as I hate to be worrying and officious, I said no more;
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • officious = too eager to offer advice or opinions
  • They are one of the most unpleasant races in the Galaxy—not actually evil, but bad-tempered, bureaucratic, officious and callous.
    Douglas Adams  --  The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
  • officious = too eager to tell others what to do
  • There was pushing and pulling and officious cries.
    William Golding  --  Lord of the Flies
  • officious = too eager to offer advice or opinions
  • ...one of those busybodies who are ever alert, officious, forward, fawning, and complaisant; who watch for strangers in their passage through the capital, tell them the scandalous history of the town, and offer them pleasure at all prices.
    Voltaire  --  Candide
  • officious = too eager to offer advice, opinions, or help
  • If by any officious exertions of his, she is induced to leave Henry's protection, there will be much less chance of his marrying her than if she remain with him.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • officious = too eagerly offered advice or opinions
  • To all she must have saved some trouble of head or hand; and were it only in supporting the spirits of her aunt Bertram, keeping her from the evil of solitude, or the still greater evil of a restless, officious companion, too apt to be heightening danger in order to enhance her own importance, her being there would have been a general good.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • officious = too eager to offer advice or opinions
  • In vain were the well-meant condescensions of Sir Thomas, and all the officious prognostications of Mrs. Norris that she would be a good girl; in vain did Lady Bertram smile and make her sit on the sofa with herself and pug, and vain was even the sight of a gooseberry tart towards giving her comfort; she could scarcely swallow two mouthfuls before tears interrupted her, and sleep seeming to be her likeliest friend, she was taken to finish her sorrows in bed.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • officious = too eager to offer advice or opinions
  • "Ah, I might have trusted you to find your own way out—don't overwhelm me with the sense of my officiousness!"
    Edith Wharton  --  The House of Mirth
  • (Editor's note:  The suffix "-ness" converts an adjective to a noun that means the quality of. This is the same pattern you see in words like darkness, kindness, and coolness.)
  • VOLT: A strange, officious, Troublesome knave! thou dost torment me.
    Ben Jonson  --  Volpone
  • At that instant she knew that in running away she had merely hidden her doubts behind the officious stir of travel.
    Sinclair Lewis  --  Main Street
  • FATHER-JACQUES: We'll make officers, officials, and officious people.
    Eugene Ionesco  --  The Future Is in Eggs
  • If there hadn't been over-officiousness it wouldn't have been made, and I hate over-officiousness at all times, whether or no. Good evening!'
    Charles Dickens  --  Hard Times
  • (Editor's note:  The suffix "-ness" converts an adjective to a noun that means the quality of. This is the same pattern you see in words like darkness, kindness, and coolness.)
  • I got chewed out by Lieutenant Warren for being stupidly officious but he opened his safe and let me check his registered publications.
    Robert A. Heinlein  --  Starship Troopers
  • A lieutenant stood up and, with solemn officiousness, warned the men to behave themselves.
    Laura Hillenbrand  --  Unbroken
  • (Editor's note:  The suffix "-ness" converts an adjective to a noun that means the quality of. This is the same pattern you see in words like darkness, kindness, and coolness.)
  • His horn-rimmed glasses helped make him seem officious and condescending.
    James Patterson  --  Kiss the Girls
  • One hates to be officious, to be giving bad impressions, making mischief.
    Jane Austen  --  Persuasion
  • But it was perhaps a mere fancy of Bob's too officious brain.
    George Eliot  --  The Mill on the Floss
  • The officious creature did not bother introducing himself, but led Max swiftly down the hall to the empty waiting room.
    Henry H. Neff  --  The Fiend And The Forge

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