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vocabulary
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obfuscate

used in a sentence
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Definition make obscure or unclear
  • He was not candid. Instead he tried to obfuscate and even deceive.
  • Issuing too many warnings will obfuscate those warnings that are truly important.
  • You're supposed to tell the truth and be open and transparent and candid about your prospects — not obfuscate.
    Nell Minow
  • In economics we call it obfuscation with a cloud of smoke and a couple of mirrors.
    Robert Ludlum  --  The Bourne Ultimatum
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • They'll work it out with embassy obfuscation and read it to us before issuing it.'
    Robert Ludlum  --  The Bourne Supremacy
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • He had one of those refined discriminating intellects whose powers of logic were more than equal to my powers of obfuscation.
    Pat Conroy  --  The Lords of Discipline
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • It was dishonest to act like Margo hadn't participated in her own obfuscation.
    John Green  --  Paper Towns
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • The stressing of this historical element will lead to confusion; it will simply obfuscate the picture message.
    Joseph Campbell  --  The Hero With a Thousand Faces
  • The Criminal Element advised "stalling, delaying, and obfuscation of every possible sort" when it came to dealing with a criminal.
    Kate DiCamillo  --  Flora & Ulysses
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • You suppose we're reading too much into this talent for obfuscation?"
    Tom Clancy  --  The Hunt for Red October
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • At first only a few random words were clear enough to be understood: "Market ... too free to be .... obfuscate ...."
    Trenton Lee Stewart  --  The Mysterious Benedict Society
  • Silenus has committed the ultimate act of non-communication," wrote Urban Kapry in the TC'v Review, "by indulging himself in an orgy of pretentious obfuscation."
    Dan Simmons  --  Hyperion
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • She is—or was, I should say—apprenticed to the minister of obfuscation and deferment, and was here performing her duties on the day the corrupted raided the building.
    Ransom Riggs  --  Hollow City
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • It's in the nature of the genre that since the act itself is buried under layers of misdirection and obfuscation, it cannot support layers of meaning or signification.
    Thomas C. Foster  --  How to Read Literature Like a Professor
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • If Drayton were with us again to write a new edition of his incomparable poem, he would sing the nymphs of Hertfordshire as indeterminate of feature, with hair obfuscated by the London smoke.
    E.M. Forster  --  Howards End
  • Didn't the insurance companies realize that the cost of their obfuscation, denial, all the frustration they caused, only made her father's health worse, and threatened that of her mother?
    Dave Eggers  --  The Circle
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Since it was inconceivable to me that Halloween was not as much a part of their vocabulary as it was of mine, I felt that I had obfuscated the high festival of witchcraft with a combination of too much talk and too much bull.
    Pat Conroy  --  The Water is Wide
  • Carried away by the daily valor of the Marines, working at a safe but obfuscating distance, and swept up in its own fantasy of a swashbuckling fight for a mountain, reporters invented the heroic fight up the slopes, and the flagraising among whizzing bullets, out of whole cloth.
    James Bradley  --  Flags of Our Fathers
  • Unlike Hobie— who assumed, incorrectly, that anyone who walked into his store was as fascinated by furniture as he was, who was extremely matter-of-fact in pointing out the flaws and virtues of a piece—I had discovered I possessed the opposite knack: of obfuscation and mystery, the ability to talk about inferior articles in ways that made people want them.
    Donna Tartt  --  The Goldfinch
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • As for uncle Pullet, he could hardly have been more thoroughly obfuscated if Mr. Tulliver had said that he was going to send Tom to the Lord Chancellor; for uncle Pullet belonged to that extinct class of British yeoman who, dressed in good broadcloth, paid high rates and taxes, went to church, and ate a particularly good dinner on Sunday, without dreaming that the British constitution in Church and State had a traceable origin any more than the solar system and the fixed stars.
    George Eliot  --  The Mill on the Floss

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