toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books

matriculate

used in a sentence
(click/touch triangles for details)
Definition to be admitted to a college or university

or more rarely:  to advance to a new school — as from middle school to high school
  • Francie wondered, if it was so good, why he hadn't matriculated there instead of at the university of another midwestern state.
    Betty Smith  --  A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
  • The senior matriculation exams obliterate everything.
    Joy Kogawa  --  Obasan
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • The girl was saying, "—but they don't want your child to matriculate with their children up here in Buffalo either, make no mistake about it!
    John Gardner  --  The Sunlight Dialogues
  • But you will respect the rules of this school, or you will matriculate someplace else.
    John Green  --  Looking for Alaska
  • It was October because it was before I came up here to join the matriculation class.
    James Joyce  --  A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • It was an era when only a minority of women matriculated at college and fewer pursued careers.
    W. William Winokur  --  The Perfect Game
  • "See, I haven't paid my matriculation fees for school yet—"
    Meg Cabot  --  Queen of Babble
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • He had matriculated at the university and attended one or two courses of lectures.
    W. Somerset Maugham  --  Of Human Bondage
  • I reverse it to that quaint period, the thirties, when the huge middle class of America was matriculating in a school for the blind.
    Tennessee Williams  --  The Glass Menagerie
  • Almost all the MITES who matriculate to MIT's freshmen class end up graduating: sixteen graduates out of seventeen one year; another crop went eighteen for eighteen.
    Ron Suskind  --  A Hope in the Unseen
  • Within three weeks of his matriculation, he had been made the dupe of a half-dozen classic jokes, his ignorance of all campus tradition had been exploited, his gullibility was a byword.
    Thomas Wolfe  --  Look Homeward, Angel
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Which reminded him that the first hurdle was tomorrow; in a few days he would either be eligible to matriculate for whatever it was he decided on, or he would be-but no use worrying about that.
    Robert A. Heinlein  --  Tunnel In the Sky
  • When twenty-two years previously-after obtaining a matriculation certificate beyond which, for lack of money, he was unable to progress-he was given this temporary post, he had been led to expect, or so he said, speedy "confirmation" in it.
    Albert Camus  --  The Plague
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Root won acceptance into Oxford, but before he could matriculate, the war ended and his father summoned him back to America, to his new home in New York City, where Root studied civil engineering at New York University and became a draftsman for the architect who later designed St. Patrick's Cathedral.
    Erik Larson  --  The Devil in the White City
  • With the help of his information he began to reckon the extent of this material obstacle, and ascertained, to his dismay, that, at the rate at which, with the best of fortune, he would be able to save money, fifteen years must elapse before he could be in a position to forward testimonials to the head of a college and advance to a matriculation examination.
    Thomas Hardy  --  Jude the Obscure
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • The rest were standing around in hatless, smoky little groups of twos and threes and fours inside the heated waiting room, talking in voices that, almost without exception, sounded collegiately dogmatic, as though each young man, in his strident, conversational turn, was clearing up, once and for all, some highly controversial issue, one that the outside, non-matriculating world had been bungling, provocatively or not, for centuries.
    J.D. Salinger  --  Franny and Zooey
  • At this stage it was decided that I should attend the Conference of the Pan-African Freedom Movement for Central, East, and Southern Africa, which was to be held early in 1962 in Addis Ababa, and, because of our need for preparation, it was also decided that, after the conference, I would undertake a tour of the African States with a view to obtaining facilities for the training of soldiers, and that I would also solicit scholarships for the higher education of matriculated Africans.
    Nelson Mandela  --  I Am Prepared to Die
  • "The bursar's office is going to break your legs if you don't pay your matriculation fees?"
    Meg Cabot  --  Queen of Babble
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • The money you said you'd loan me for my matriculation fees?
    Meg Cabot  --  Queen of Babble
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • She was told that she couldn't matriculate lacking a high school education.
    Betty Smith  --  A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
Search for other examples by interest
InterestSource
General — Google News®
General — Time® Magazine
General — Wikipedia®
Architecture — Google® books - Architecture
Business — Bloomberg®
Business — The Economist®
Classic Literature — Google® books - Classical Literature
Engineering — Google® books - Engineering
Engineering — Popular Mechanics®
Engineering — Discover Magazine®
Fine Arts & Music — Google® books - Art
History — Google® books - History
Human Behavior — Google® books - Psychology
Human Behavior — Psychology Today®
Law — FindLaw®
Law — Google® books - Law
Logic & Reasoning — Google® books - Reasoning
Medicine — Web MD®
Medicine — Google® books - Medicine
Nature & Ecology — National Geographic®
Nature & Ecology — Google® books - Nature
Personal Finance — Kiplinger® (Personal Finance)
Philosophy — Google® books - Philosophy
Public Policy & Politics — Newsweek®
Public Policy & Politics — Real Clear Politics®
Public Policy & Politics — Google® books - Politics
Religion & Spirtuality — Google® books - Religion
Religion - Christianity — Bible Gateway®
Religion - Christianity — Google® books - Christianity
Science — Popular Science®
Science — Scientific American®
Science — Google® books - Science
Sports — Sports Illustrated®