toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books

languid

used in a sentence
(click/touch triangles for details)
Definition lacking energy or relaxed or moving slowly
  • No urging could increase his languid pace.
languid = slow (lacking energy or relaxed)
  • a languid wave of the hand
  • A gradual warmth, a languorous weariness passed over him descending along his spine from his closely cowled head.
    James Joyce  --  A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
  • languorous = slow, relaxed, or with little energy
  • He did everything with direct and decisive movements, in contrast to his languid look.
    Gabriel Garcia Marquez  --  One Hundred Years of Solitude
  • languid = relaxed
  • Louisa awoke from a torpor, and her eyes languidly opened on her old bed at home, and her old room.
    Charles Dickens  --  Hard Times
  • languidly = slowly and in a relaxing, non-energetic manner
  • the languid beat of the stern-wheel came plainly to my ears.
    Joseph Conrad  --  Heart of Darkness
  • languid = slowly moving
  • She looked up at him languidly, as though her lids were weighted with sleep and it cost her an effort to raise them.
    Edith Wharton  --  Ethan Frome
  • languidly = slowly and without much energy
  • at last the Caterpillar ... addressed her in a languid, sleepy voice.
    Lewis Carroll  --  Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
  • languid = slow and lacking energy
  • Most of the children were still in a land of half stupor, languid, like limp rags.
    Robert Cormier  --  After the First Death
  • languid = having little energy and moving slowly
  • On the whole, however, they seemed languid and exhausted.
    Albert Camus  --  The Stranger
  • languid = to lack energy
  • At once he starts eating sleepily, she to eat languidly, staring vaguely out.
    Thornton Wilder  --  Our Town
  • languidly = in a slow, relaxed manner without much energy
  • The two men sauntered languidly to the table
    Oscar Wilde  --  The Picture of Dorian Gray
  • languidly = moving slowly
  • The first signs of reawakening came when he discovered more than languid interest in the daily paper.
    London, Jack  --  Martin Eden
  • a hot languorous afternoon
  • In India she had always felt hot and too languid to care much about anything.
    Burnett, Frances Hodgson  --  The Secret Garden
  • He gave, at any rate, like a convalescent slightly fatigued, a languid shake of his head.
    James, Henry  --  Turn Of The Screw
  • and, for a moment, Wolfe lifted his languid head.
    Hawthorne, Nathaniel  --  Grandfather's Chair
  • How languid their conversation the last evening of their being together
    Austen, Jane  --  Sense and Sensibility
  • Liza Merkalova was a thin brunette, with an Oriental, languid type of face, and—as everyone used to say—exquisite enigmatic eyes.
    Tolstoy, Leo  --  Anna Karenina
  • Ah I ever I behold Thy dreamy, passionate eyes, Blue as the languid skies
    Poe, Edgar Allan  --  Poems

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
Search for other examples by interest
InterestSource
General — Google News®
General — Time® Magazine
General — Wikipedia®