toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books

infatuated

used in a sentence
(click/touch triangles for details)
Definition under the unreasoning spell of new love or attraction
  • He is infatuated with her.
  • "I only say that we're too infatuated with mere brain-power; that, after all, isn't a vulgar fault.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volumes 1 & 2
  • Make it look like an infatuation, perhaps.
    John Le Carre  --  The Spy Who Came In From The Cold
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • What infatuation is it, what obstinate prepossession, that blinds you to that?
    George Eliot  --  The Mill on the Floss
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • But your arts and allurements may, in a moment of infatuation, have made him forget what he owes to himself and to all his family.
    Jane Austen  --  Pride and Prejudice
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • "I only say that we're too infatuated with mere brain-power; that, after all, isn't a vulgar fault.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volume 2
  • I felt like a boy talking to his first infatuation.
    Bella Forrest  --  A Shade of Vampire
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • I don't think mating and infatuation and friendships and closeness would occur if our faces didn't work that way."
    Malcolm Gladwell  --  Blink
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Everyone who heard of his infatuation for the school teacher was sure it would turn out badly.
    Sherwood Anderson  --  Winesburg, Ohio
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Upon this occasion my father said, with an expression of unbounded wonder, "My dearest Victor, what infatuation is this?
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • And how strange an infatuation on Frederick's side!
    Jane Austen  --  Northanger Abbey
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • How good of you to wait in the rain all this time—to gratify my infatuation!
    Thomas Hardy  --  Jude the Obscure
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • I could hope for nothing from one so infatuated with and devoted to his master.
    Jules Verne  --  A Journey to the Center of the Earth
  • In college she had harbored lengthy infatuations, with students with whom she never spoke, with professors and TAs.
    Jhumpa Lahiri  --  The Namesake
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in actions, illustrations, and observations.)
  • Is there nothing left, to which I can appeal against this terrible infatuation!'
    Charles Dickens  --  Oliver Twist
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Usually I hate it when artists get too infatuated with light, but this is special.
    Christina Garcia  --  Dreaming in Cuban
  • It was time to end her little infatuation with Mike once and for all.
    Nicholas Sparks  --  The Guardian
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • No, Viv: your infatuated little boy will have to stick to you in any case.
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Mrs. Warren's Profession
  • I've come to learn that there's real value in that—a value greater than any infatuation.
    Henry H. Neff  --  The Maelstrom
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • She wanted to be taken and she was, and what had begun with a childish infatuation on a beach was accomplished at last.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald  --  Tender is the Night
(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
Search for other examples by interest
InterestSource
General — Google News®
General — Time® Magazine
General — Wikipedia®