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indignant

used in a sentence
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Definition angered or annoyed at something unjust or wrong
  • She was indignant, but agreed to be searched when they accused her of shoplifting.
indignant = angered or annoyed at something unjust or wrong
  • "I am not a fool," she said indignantly.
  • indignantly = with anger or annoyance at something unjust or wrong
  • "Don't you dare talk to me that way!" she replied indignantly.
    Joseph Heller  --  Catch-22
  • indignantly = angered by the wrong
  • She only felt a furious surge of indignation that he should think her such a fool.
    Margaret Mitchell  --  Gone with the Wind
  • indignation = anger at being wronged
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • "I'd like to suggest that it be named for my husband," Mrs. Poole had said, and looked around, indignant that no one else had made this suggestion.
    Jill McCorkle  --  Ferris Beach
  • indignant = angered or annoyed at something unjust or wrong
  • "I wasn't snooping," said Katie indignantly.
    Betty Smith  --  A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
  • indignantly = with anger or annoyance at something unjust or wrong
  • And sometimes the difference between individual and organized indignation is the difference between criminal and political action.
    Ralph Ellison  --  Invisible Man
  • indignation = anger at something unjust or wrong
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Afterwards he saw her lower lip quiver with indignation at her brother's insolent, cruel and ungrateful words
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky  --  Crime and Punishment
  • indignation = anger or annoyance at something unjust or wrong
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • There was no indignation in her voice—only deep regret.
    George Eliot  --  Silas Marner
  • indignation = anger at something unjust or wrong
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • "So you don't think I'm a match for Lucius Malfoy?" said Mr. Weasley indignantly,
    J.K. Rowling  --  Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
  • indignantly = with anger or annoyance at something unjust or wrong
  • Her indignation failed her, and she broke off sobbing.
    Charles Dickens  --  Hard Times
  • indignation = anger at something unjust or wrong
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • I was trying to be indignant but he was so cute.
    Sarah Dessen  --  Someone Like You
  • indignant = angered or annoyed at something unjust or wrong
  • When he was before me, towering, indignant, I could not remember how, when I was young, his laugh used to shake his gut and make his glasses shine.
    Tara Westover  --  Educated
  • indignant = angered at a wrong
  • He was working himself up to indignation.
    John Knowles  --  A Separate Peace
  • indignation = anger at something unjust or wrong
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • He fairly choked with indignation.
    Bram Stoker  --  Dracula
  • indignation = anger at something unjust or wrong
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Her tone is intentionally indignant, as if the question itself offended her.
    Neal Shusterman  --  Unwind
  • indignant = displaying anger or annoyance at something unjust or wrong
  • Daring, indignant, Piggy took the conch. "That's what I said! I said about our meetings and things and then you said shut up—"
    William Golding  --  Lord of the Flies
  • indignant = angered at something unjust
  • "I'd sooner eat dirt," he said with a look of indignation.
    Khaled Hosseini  --  The Kite Runner
  • indignation = anger at something unjust or wrong
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • "That's a ridiculous law," said Milo, quite indignantly.
    Norton Juster  --  The Phantom Tollbooth
  • indignantly = with anger or annoyance at something unjust or wrong
  • Kit flared, indignant as much at his tone as at the dread word he uttered so carelessly.
    Elizabeth George Speare  --  The Witch of Blackbird Pond
indignant = anger or annoyance at something unjust or wrong

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