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ignoble
used in a sentence

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Definition completely lacking nobility in character, quality or purpose
  • There is something cowardly and ignoble in his attitude.
ignoble = completely lacking nobility in character, quality or purpose
  • To give him annual tribute, do him homage;
    Subject his coronet to his crown, and bend
    The dukedom, yet unbow'd—alas, poor Milan!—
    To most ignoble stooping.
    William Shakespeare  --  The Tempest
  • ignoble = completely lacking nobility in character
  • Here is the head of that ignoble traitor,
    Shakespeare, William  --  King Richard III
  • Also I warn you once more that you had better avoid such hints and ignoble suppositions; otherwise you will assuredly have to reckon with me.
    Dostoyevsky, Fyodor  --  The Gambler
  • ...she thought it was ignoble in her husband not to apologize to her.
    Eliot, George  --  Middlemarch
  • But it is not ignoble to feel that the fuller life which a sad experience has brought us is worth our own personal share of pain.
    Eliot, George  --  Adam Bede
  • It was some foul parody, some infamous ignoble satire.
    Wilde, Oscar  --  The Picture Of Dorian Gray
  • Then personal appearance sympathised with mental deterioration:  he acquired a slouching gait and ignoble look;
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • But it is not ignoble to feel that the fuller life which a sad experience has brought us is worth our own personal share of pain.
    George Eliot  --  Adam Bede
  • That would be a disastrous and ignoble thing to do.
    Joseph Heller  --  Catch-22
  • —she felt as sorry for him as she had sometimes felt for Abe North and his ignoble destiny, sorry as for the helplessness of infants and the old.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald  --  Tender is the Night
  • She had no wish to fall into that grotesqueness—in which she had seen women (and it was a warning) serenely, yet ignobly, flounder.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volume 1
  • I know it is ignoble: a mere fever of the flesh: not, I declare, the convulsion of the soul.
    Charlotte Bronte  --  Jane Eyre
  • An ignoble end for a bodyguard of his calibre.
    Eoin Colfer  --  Artemis Fowl
  • It was some foul parody, some infamous, ignoble satire.
    Oscar Wilde  --  The Picture of Dorian Gray
  • I am ignoble in her eyes.
    Oscar Wilde  --  An Ideal Husband
  • When Luna adopts a flag, I would like it to be a cannon or, on field sable, crossed by bar sinister gules of our proudly ignoble lineage.
    Robert A. Heinlein  --  The Moon is a Harsh Mistress
  • The body looked shrunk and ignoble.
    W. Somerset Maugham  --  Of Human Bondage
  • An equally gratifying (if ignoble) memory was Pippa's slight, shocked pause when I'd broken the news to her on the phone.
    Donna Tartt  --  The Goldfinch
  • "It was base," he said indignantly, "it was ignoble."
    Aldous Huxley  --  Brave New World

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