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fickle

used in a sentence
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Definition having a tendency to change suddenly — such as a person quick to change their mind, or the weather in a region where it changes rapidly
  • I can't imagine depending upon the fickle wind to sail around the world.
fickle = having a tendency to change suddenly
  • We got the independent vote last time, but the independent vote is notoriously fickle.
  • fickle = having a tendency to change suddenly
  • O fortune, fortune! All men call thee fickle.
    William Shakespeare  --  Romeo and Juliet
  • fickle = quick to change
  •   Be fickle, fortune;
      For then, I hope, thou wilt not keep him long
      But send him back.
    William Shakespeare  --  Romeo and Juliet
  • fickle = quick to change
  •   [speaking to "fortune"]
      If thou art fickle, what dost thou with him
      That is renowned for faith?
    William Shakespeare  --  Romeo and Juliet
  • fickle = quick to change
  • all men call thee fickle.
    Shakespeare, William  --  Romeo and Juliet
  • I think you are very fickle minded.
    Montgomery, Lucy Maud  --  Anne Of Green Gables
  • And he said what you said about him, that he's fickle by nature, he's not like you, and I should be a fool to throw you away for him.
    Maugham, W. Somerset  --  Of Human Bondage
  • Nothing however, is more fickle than such a resolution of the people.
    Dumas, Alexandre  --  The Black Tulip
  • In France, amongst a fickle wavering nation;
    Shakespeare, William  --  King Henry VI, Part 1
  • I learned in the last few years that it's really unhappy and really unsustainable to try and base your well being on something as arbitrary as record sale and critical acclaim and the interests of the public. All of those things are so fickle. So my approach now to music is I want to make records that I love, and I hope that other people love them, then that's OK.
    Moby
  • As usual, the fickle, unreasoning world took Muff Potter to its bosom and fondled him as lavishly as it had abused him before.
    Twain, Mark  --  Tom Sawyer
  • yelled the fickle mob, who from jeering him were now his warm friends.
    McSpadden, J. Walker  --  Robin Hood
  • And giddy Fortune's furious fickle wheel,
    Shakespeare, William  --  King Henry V
  • The fickleness of the women I love is only equaled by the infernal constancy of the women who love me.
    George Bernard Shaw
  • (Editor's note:  The suffix "-ness" converts an adjective to a noun that means state or degree of. This is the same pattern you see in words like darkness, kindness, and coolness.)
  • Dwells in the fickle grace of her he follows.
    Shakespeare, William  --  King Lear
  • 'Woman is fickle.
    Dumas, Alexandre  --  The Count of Monte Cristo
  • And the people being fickle, and ever ready to worship the rising sun, clapped their hands and cried, '/Twala is king
    Haggard, Rider H.  --  King Solomon's Mines
  • Clapp'd on the outward eye of fickle France,
    Shakespeare, William  --  King John
  • False and fickle one
    Grimm, Jacob and Wilhelm  --  Fairy Tales

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