toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books

enervate

used in a sentence
(click/touch triangles for details)
Definition weaken mentally or morally

or:

disturb the composure of
  • The late nights and drugs were so enervating, she couldn't hold on to her job.
enervating = weaken mentally or morally

or:

disturb the composure of
  • Other nights she could sleep for eighteen drugged hours and wake, enervated, hardly able to stand.
    Thomas Pynchon  --  The Crying of Lot 49
  • enervated = weaken mentally or morally

    or:

    disturb the composure of
  • Now they must either attack the fort and accept the onus of striking the first blow, or face an indefinite and enervating occupation of Sumter by Anderson's soldiers.
    Richard Hofstadter  --  Abraham Lincoln and the Self-Made Myth
  • enervating = weaken mentally or morally

    or:

    disturb the composure of
  • What is the nature of the luxury which enervates and destroys nations?
    Thoreau, Henry David  --  Walden & on the Duty of Civil Disobedience
  • An artful cabal in that council would be able to distract and to enervate the whole system of administration.
    Hamilton, Alexander  --  Federalist Papers Authored by Alexander Hamilton
  • ... recollections calculated to enervate and distress
    Bronte, Charlotte  --  Jane Eyre
  • Morrel hesitated to advance; he dreaded the enervating effect of all that he saw.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Count of Monte Cristo
  • The heat of it enervated.
    Nora Roberts  --  Dark Witch
  • On Wednesday he appeared at the office after a week at home, and Leona Cassiani was horrified at seeing him so pale and enervated.
    Gabriel Garcia Marquez  --  Love in the Time of Cholera
  • An artful cabal in that council would be able to distract and to enervate the whole system of administration.
    Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, & John Jay  --  The Federalist Papers
  • But, mindful of paramount obligations I strive against scruples that may tend to enervate decision.
    Herman Melville  --  Billy Budd
  • I had grown to find those occasions of vice enervating.
    V.S. Naipaul  --  A Bend in the River
  • There is, in that mode of life, good mingled with evil, for if enervation is baleful, generosity is good and healthful.
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • It was exhausting and enervating and deliciously pleasurable.
    Pat Conroy  --  The Lords of Discipline
  • Liza was as soft and enervated as Sappho was smart and abrupt.
    Leo Tolstoy  --  Anna Karenina
  • The air of the place, so fresh in the spring and early summer, was stagnant and enervating now.
    Thomas Hardy  --  Tess of the d'Urbervilles
  • Take away the press; heresy is enervated.
    Victor Hugo  --  The Hunchback of Notre Dame
  • It was the final affront, more subtle and more enervating than the offer to teach chemistry to children.
    Sinclair Lewis  --  Arrowsmith
  • I was sick, enervated, depressed, losing my tenuous hold on reality.
    Betty Mahmoody  --  Not Without My Daughter
  • And what is the cause of the enervation and apathy that arise when the rules of life are not abrogated from time to time?
    Thomas Mann  --  The Magic Mountain
(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
Search for other examples by interest
InterestSource
General — Google News®
General — Time® Magazine
General — Wikipedia®