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emancipated

used in a sentence
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Definition released from slavery or servitude; or (metaphorically) from social restraints
  • She was an emancipated 20th century woman pursuing her career.
emancipated = released from social restraints

(used as a metaphor for the literal sense of being released from slavery)
  • In 1776, a committee of Quakers emancipated forty slaves, but authorities declared the act illegal.
  • emancipated = released from slavery
  • Age has emancipated you; you no longer even stand in need of my consent.
    Dumas, Alexandre  --  Ten Years Later
  • Free blacks who agitated for the emancipation of their fellow blacks invoked the narrative of the of liberation in the Book of Exodus, in which Moses led the captive Israelites to freedom.
    Dinesh D'Souza  --  What's So Great About Christianity
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • First, in two chapters I have tried to show what Emancipation meant to them, and what was its aftermath.
    W. E. B. Du Bois  --  The Souls of Black Folk
  • emancipation = the act of being released from slavery or servitude; or (metaphorically) from social restraints
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • But neither the United States nor any State shall assume or pay any debt or obligation incurred in aid of insurrection or rebellion against the United States, or any claim for the loss or emancipation of any slave; but all such debts, obligations and claims shall be held illegal and void.
    United States 'Founding Fathers'  --  The Constitution of the United States
  • emancipation = the act of being released from slavery or servitude; or (metaphorically) from social restraints
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Since emancipation, almost a hundred years ago,
    Ernest J. Gaines  --  A Lesson Before Dying
  • emancipation = release from slavery
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • But when that dawn will come, of our emancipation, from the fear of bondage and the bondage of fear, why, that is a secret.
    Alan Paton  --  Cry, the Beloved Country
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • He had overseen the drafting of a constitution in 1964, which turned Afghanistan into a democracy, offering universal suffrage and emancipating women.
    Greg Mortenson & David Oliver Relin  --  Three Cups of Tea
  • The young men nowadays were emancipating themselves from the law and business and taking up all sorts of new things.
    Edith Wharton  --  The Age of Innocence
  • The light of day reassured me; I went and threw myself on the bed, without parting with the emancipating knife, which I concealed under my pillow.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Three Musketeers
  • Therefore every man has perfect freedom, provided he emancipates himself from mundane desires.
    Piper Kerman  --  Orange Is the New Black
  • 'If I were to recognize the Russian orthodox religion and emancipate the serfs, do you think Russia would come over to me?'
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky  --  The Idiot
  • Since he was emancipated from a nurse and a nursery-governess, he had had his rocking-horse removed to his own bedroom at the top of the house.
    D. H. Lawrence  --  The Rocking-Horse Winner
  • Emancipation was a salient issue for Union soldiers because it was controversial.
    James M. McPherson  --  What They Fought For - 1861-1865
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • They recognized that economic emancipation was the key to the racial solution.
    John Howard Griffin  --  Black Like Me
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • It was an age in which the human intellect, newly emancipated, had taken a more active and a wider range than for many centuries before.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  The Scarlet Letter
  • The more I see of emancipation the more criminal I think it is.
    Margaret Mitchell  --  Gone with the Wind
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • United action, of the leading civilised countries at least, is one of the first conditions for the emancipation of the proletariat.
    Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels  --  The Communist Manifesto
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • But emancipation is a proclamation and not a fact.
    Lyndon B. Johnson  --  We Shall Overcome
(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)

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