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divine

used in a sentence
3 meanings
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1  —as in:
to forgive is divine
Definition wonderful; or god-like or coming from God
  • Her pies are divine.
divine = wonderful
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • We prayed for divine guidance.
  • The King claimed a divine right.
  • divine = coming from God
  • The lesson which life repeats and constantly enforces is "look under foot." You are always nearer the divine and the true sources of your power than you think.
    John Burroughs
  • To err is human, to forgive divine.
    Alexander Pope
  • If you love everything, you will perceive the divine mystery in things.
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky  --  The Brothers Karamazov
  • the divine strength of Achilles
  • Kriss, isn't this divine?
    Kiera Cass  --  The Selection
  • divine = wonderful
  • I imagined how I would describe my change, my divine transformation, what words of gratitude I would shout.
    Tara Westover  --  Educated
  • divine = wonderful; or coming from God
  • Despised substance of divinest show!
    William Shakespeare  --  Romeo and Juliet
divinest = most wonderful

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —as in:
divined from tea leaves
Definition to predict or discover something supernaturally (as if by magic)
  • She claims she can divine the future with a crystal ball.
divine = to predict or discover something supernaturally (as if by magic)
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • She claims she can divine the location of underground water.
  • divine = predict or discover something supernaturally (as if by magic)
  • Divination is one of the most imprecise branches of magic. ... True Seers are very rare,
    J.K. Rowling  --  Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
  • divination = to predict or discover something supernaturally
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • I have an ill-divining soul!
    William Shakespeare  --  Romeo and Juliet
  • divining = predicting something by magic
  • It's like divining for water.
    Neal Shusterman  --  Unwind
  • divining = finding in a supernatural way
  • After the death of Ekwefi's second child, Okonkwo had gone to a medicine man, who was also a diviner of the Afa Oracle, to enquire what was amiss.
    Chinua Achebe  --  Things Fall Apart
  • diviner = someone who practices the art of learning of the future through supernatural means
  • In other bills he had a lot of other names and done other wonderful things, like finding water and gold with a "divining-rod," "dissipating witch spells," and so on.
    Mark Twain  --  The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  • divining = used to discover something supernaturally (as if by magic)
  • we have almost finished our work on planetary divination.
    J.K. Rowling  --  Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
  • divination = to predict something by magic
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • The divination of my arts shall tell.
    Sophocles  --  Antigone
  • divination = the act of predicting or discover something supernaturally (as if by magic)
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • It's never too early to think about the future, so I'd recommend Divination.
    J.K. Rowling  --  Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
divination = to predict something by magic
(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
3  —as in:
divined through intuition
Definition to discover something — usually through intuition or reflection
  • They are trying to divine the outcome of next year's election.
divine = to discover something — usually through intuition or reflection
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • She wouldn't talk about it, but I was able to divine that the project isn't going well.
  • divine = discover
  • This and more I sat divining, with my head at ease reclining
    Edgar Allan Poe  --  The Raven
  • divining = trying to discover through reflection (thinking)
  • The world was to me a secret which I desired to divine.
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
  • divine = discover
  • One still has time before one to divine.
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables
  • divine = discover something through intuition or reflection
  • For I no sooner in my heart divined,
    John Milton  --  Paradise Lost
  • divined = discovered through intuition
  • As you have divined, sir, we are not mad; neither are we violent or bloodthirsty.
    Mark Twain  --  A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court
  • divined = discovered
  • Often the soul is ripened into fuller goodness while age has spread an ugly film, so that mere glances can never divine the preciousness of the fruit.
    George Eliot  --  Silas Marner
  • divine = discover
  • While he was thinking one thing in his brain, I was endeavoring to divine his thought in mine.
    Henry David Thoreau  --  Walden
  • divine = discover
  • She would divine his attitude at once and...
    Thornton Wilder  --  The Bridge of San Luis Rey
divine = discover (figure out)

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
Less commonly:
In the time of Shakespeare, divine was sometimes used as a noun to reference a priest or a person of the church. (To remember that sense, think of the clergyman as having come from God).

Divinity typically refers to a god or to a school of religion, but on rare occasions, it refers to the name of a kind of soft white candy. To remember that sense, you might think of it as tasting divine/wonderful.
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