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disperse
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Definition to scatter or cause to spread
  • The crowd dispersed.
  • The birds eat the fruit and disperse the seeds through the countryside.
  • disperse = scatter
  • There were days when they assembled and then promptly dispersed again, frankly admitting to one another that there was not really anything to be done.
    George Orwell  --  1984
  • dispersed = scattered (stop being a crowd in one place)
  • He had come up from deep down in the water as the dark cloud of blood had settled and dispersed in the mile deep sea.
    Ernest Hemingway  --  The Old Man and the Sea
  • dispersed = spread
  • After ten minutes or so, during which the Firebolt was Passed around and admired from every angle, the crowd dispersed and...
    J.K. Rowling  --  Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
  • dispersed = scattered and left
  • The bell gave us the signal to disperse.
    Elie Wiesel  --  Night
  • disperse = leave (moving away from each other)
  • Some were missing and he knew that she had started on her own slow process of dispersing the dynamite in her house, stick by stick.
    Ray Bradbury  --  Fahrenheit 451
  • dispersing = spreading
  • Men who before this change seemed to have been hid in caves dispersed themselves and were employed in various arts of cultivation.
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
  • dispersed = spread out (scattered)
  • Ralph looked back at the dispersing smoke in the horizon, then up at the mountain.
    William Golding  --  Lord of the Flies
  • dispersing = spreading (thinning out)
  • The carriage moved off through the dispersing crowd.
    Margaret Mitchell  --  Gone with the Wind
  • dispersing = scattering (moving away from each other)
  • The morning was rather favourable, though it had rained all night, as the clouds were then dispersing across the sky, and the sun frequently appeared.
    Jane Austen  --  Sense and Sensibility
  • dispersing = spreading (moving away from each other)
  • When a body—a tree or an animal, for instance—died and disintegrated, the atoms dispersed and could be used again in new bodies.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie's World
  • dispersed = scattered (spread out)
  • And first I had to wait for the mob to disperse.
    Jon Krakauer  --  Into Thin Air
  • disperse = scatter (spread out)
  • A few people lingered round and praised her playing, but finding that she made no reply, dispersed to their rooms to write up their diaries or to sleep.
    E.M. Forster  --  A Room With A View
  • dispersed = scattered and left
  • They gave Pahom a feather-bed to sleep on, and the Bashkirs dispersed for the night, promising to assemble the next morning at daybreak and ride out before sunrise to the appointed spot.
    Leo Tolstoy  --  How Much Land Does a Man Need?
  • dispersed = scattered (left each other)
  • The trade routes that had once converged on the great harbours, and later on the great airports, had finally dispersed into an intricate web-work covering the whole world with no major nodal points.
    Arthur C. Clarke  --  Childhood's End
  • dispersed = spread
  • It was a long while before the crowd around the Weasley twins dispersed, then Fred, Lee and George sat up counting their takings even longer, so it was well past midnight when Harry, Ron and Hermione finally had the common room to themselves.
    J.K. Rowling  --  Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
  • dispersed = scattered and left
  • Harry stopped walking and let out a long sigh, his smoky breath dispersing rapidly upon the frozen air.
    J.K. Rowling  --  Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
  • dispersing = spreading and thinning out
  • The crowd had almost dispersed now, the stragglers giving the monumental figure of Grawp a wide berth as he cuddled Hagrid, whose howls of grief were still echoing across the water.
    J.K. Rowling  --  Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince
  • dispersed = scattered and left
  • After this, the boys dispersed for a final lark, leaving Mrs. March and her daughters under the festival tree.
    Louisa May Alcott  --  Little Women

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