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discretion

used in a sentence
3 meanings
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1  —as in:
It is within her discretion.
Definition the right to make a decision (and perhaps accompanying good judgment)
  • The new law reduces a judge's discretion when sentencing violent criminals.
discretion = the right to make a decision
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • Airlines have broad discretion to refuse to transport any passenger thought to be a safety risk.
  • discretion = the right to make a decision
  • It's just not practical to write a disorderly conduct law that does not depend upon police discretion.
  • discretion = the right to make decisions (and perhaps accompanying good judgment)
  • It was an abuse of prosecutorial discretion.
  • discretion = the right to make decisions
  • She serves at the discretion of the President.
  • discretion = right to make a decision (The President can decide if she holds an office or not.)
  • She serves at the President's discretion.
  • discretion = right to make a decision (The President can decide if she holds an office or not.)
  • This is a strong argument for leaving the matter to the discretion of the legislature.
    Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, & John Jay  --  The Federalist Papers — Modern English Edition 2
  • discretion = the authority to make a decision
  • Counsel reserves the right to terminate at her discretion.
    J.D. Robb  --  Glory in Death
  • discretion = the authority to make a decision
  • Tom saw that he could sell or trade at his discretion, and so for the time was well pleased.
    Zane Grey  --  The Thundering Herd
  • discretion = authority to use his judgment to make a decision
  • "You could request a humanitarian visa." That's at the discretion of the attorney general and it's not easily given.
    Khaled Hosseini  --  The Kite Runner
discretion = authority to use judgment to do something

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —as in:
embarrassing lack of discretion
Definition behavior that does not attract undesired attention or reveal private information
  • This firm prides itself on its discretion and will not reveal client matters or even acknowledge who is a client.
discretion = behavior that does not attract undesired attention or reveal secrets
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • I mistakenly thought I could trust her discretion, so I gave her my cell phone number. Now I need a new number.
  • discretion = behavior that does not reveal private information
  • I thought I could trust his discretion, but it turns out that he likes to gossip.
  • discretion = behavior that does not attract undesired attention or reveal private information
  • You must know, of course, our client data is strictly confidential. Paradise has a reputation for discretion as well as excellence.
    J.D. Robb  --  Naked in Death
  • discretion = behavior that does not attract attention or reveal private information
  • She had told Morris Townsend that she would not mention him to her father, and she saw no reason to retract this vow of discretion.
    Henry James  --  Washington Square
  • discretion = keeping a secret (so that discomfort is not caused for another)
  • However much I paid Jamaican servants I would never buy discretion.
    Jean Rhys  --  Wide Sargasso Sea
  • discretion = trustworthiness with secrets
  • She said nothing, however, but, "Sad, sad girl! I do not know when I shall have done scolding you," and had discretion enough to reserve the rest till they might be secure of having four walls to themselves.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • discretion = behavior that does not attract undesired attention
  • I'd be willing to compensate you for your time and your discretion.
    J.D. Robb  --  Glory in Death
  • discretion = behavior that does not attract attention or reveal private information
  • Mr. Harding feared there had been at least very flagrant indiscretion.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • indiscretion = embarrassing behavior
    (Editor's note:  The prefix "in-" in indiscretion means not and reverses the meaning of discretion. This is the same pattern you see in words like invisible, incomplete, and insecure.)
  • Yet there must have been some marked display of attentions to her cousin, there must have been some strong indiscretion, since her correspondent was not of a sort to regard a slight one.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
indiscretion = embarrassing behavior
(Editor's note:  The prefix "in-" in indiscretion means not and reverses the meaning of discretion. This is the same pattern you see in words like invisible, incomplete, and insecure.)

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
3  —as in:
Parental discretion advised.
Definition good judgment or good taste
  • This program contains violence that may not be appropriate for younger viewers. Parental discretion is advised.
discretion = good judgment
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • She describes it as an indiscretion of her youth and not representative of who she is today.
  • indiscretion = lack of good judgment
    (Editor's note:  The prefix "in-" in indiscretion means not and reverses the meaning of discretion. This is the same pattern you see in words like invisible, incomplete, and insecure.)
  • I count on her good discretion to recommend sound investments.
  • discretion = behavior that displays good judgment
  • I have not interfered, I have left you your liberty, I have remembered that you are no longer a little girl-that you have arrived at years of discretion.
    Henry James  --  Washington Square
  • discretion = good judgment
  • I daresay you know, like everybody else, that once, many years ago, I was guilty of an indiscretion.
    Henrik Ibsen  --  A Doll's House
  • indiscretion = behavior that displayed poor judgment
    (Editor's note:  The prefix "in-" in indiscretion means not and reverses the meaning of discretion. This is the same pattern you see in words like invisible, incomplete, and insecure.)
  • Has she never in her life done some folly—some indiscretion—that she should not forgive your sin?
    Oscar Wilde  --  An Ideal Husband
  • indiscretion = behavior that displays a lack of good judgment
    (Editor's note:  The prefix "in-" in indiscretion means not and reverses the meaning of discretion. This is the same pattern you see in words like invisible, incomplete, and insecure.)
  • There was something that he lacked: discretion, aloofness, a sort of saving stupidity.
    George Orwell  --  1984
  • discretion = good judgment
  • Yes, the profession is well enough under two circumstances: if it make the fortune, and there be discretion in spending it;
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • discretion = good judgment
  • Their appointments should be made with discretion and discernment.
    Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, & John Jay  --  The Federalist Papers — Modern English Edition 2
  • discretion = good judgment
  • The subjects of foreign powers might suffer from the same cause, and hence the Union be discredited and embroiled by the indiscretion of a single member.
    Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, & John Jay  --  The Federalist Papers
indiscretion = behavior that displays a lack of good judgment
(Editor's note:  The prefix "in-" in indiscretion means not and reverses the meaning of discretion. This is the same pattern you see in words like invisible, incomplete, and insecure.)

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
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