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dilatory
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Definition slow; or causing or tending to delay things
  • They are resorting to every dilatory tactic at their disposal to slow the investigation.
dilatory = slowing
  • She accused the mayor of having been intentionally dilatory in eliminating corruption.
  • dilatory = slow (delaying)
  • His family knew him to be, on all common occasions, a most negligent and dilatory correspondent; but at such a time they had hoped for exertion.
    Jane Austen  --  Pride and Prejudice
  • The dilatory limousine came rolling up the drive.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald  --  The Great Gatsby
  • dilatory = slow or late
  • ...a merchant or two, at the door of the post-office, together with an editor and a miscellaneous politician, awaiting a dilatory mail;
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  The House of the Seven Gables
  • dilatory = late (delayed)
  • —this, the perfect setting for his dilatory indolence:
    William Faulkner  --  Absalom, Absalom!
  • dilatory = inclined to waste time
  • A little girl was driving home her cow, a plodding, dilatory, provoking creature in her behavior, but a valued companion for all that.
    Sarah Jewett  --  A White Heron
  • dilatory = slow (inclined to cause delay)
  • After a pause he added "sir" in a dilatory, grudging way.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald  --  The Great Gatsby
  • dilatory = slow
  • I am not to blame that the Minister is vacillating, a coward, dense, dilatory, and has all bad qualities.
    Tolstoy, Leo  --  War and Peace
  • More dilatory counsels prevailed.
    Joseph Conrad  --  Lord Jim
  • Dear Miss Tallis, Thank you for sending us Two Figures by a Fountain, and please accept our apologies for this dilatory response.
    Ian McEwan  --  Atonement
  • His family knew him to be, on all common occasions, a most negligent and dilatory correspondent; but at such a time they had hoped for exertion.
    Jane Austen  --  Pride and Prejudice
  • I've got a complaint that makes me a little dilatory.
    George Eliot  --  Middlemarch
  • I am not to blame that the Minister is vacillating, a coward, dense, dilatory, and has all bad qualities.
    Leo Tolstoy  --  War and Peace
  • He had had full warning of Mr. Flack's intentions, and might have bought the plot before building commenced: but he was apathetic and dilatory.
    E.M. Forster  --  A Room With A View
  • ] I may perceive These Cardinals trifle with me; I abhor This dilatory sloth and tricks of Rome.
    William Shakespeare  --  Henry VIII
  • Thou know'st we work by wit, and not by witchcraft; And wit depends on dilatory time.
    William Shakespeare  --  Othello, the Moor of Venice
  • He always moved with the alertness of a mind which could neither be undecided nor dilatory, but now he seemed more sudden than usual in his disappearance.
    Jane Austen  --  Emma
  • Once the mosquitoes hit, the cow's dilatoriness became almost more than Newt could endure.
    Larry McMurtry  --  Lonesome Dove
  • The winter, however, was spent cheerfully; and although the spring was uncommonly late, when it came its beauty compensated for its dilatoriness.
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein

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