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digress
used in a sentence

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Definition wander from a direct or straight course — especially verbally
  • She always digresses when telling a story.
digresses = wanders from a direct course
  • She likes it when they stick to the numbers and don't digress into storytelling.
  • digress = wander from a direct course
  • "All this is a digression," he added in a different tone.
    George Orwell  --  1984
  • digression = off the main topic (wandering from a direct course)
  • Before he came to the heart of his intentions, Dr. Urbino Daza made several digressions on the subject of aging.
    Gabriel Garcia Marquez  --  Love in the Time of Cholera
  • digressions = wanderings from the main topic
  • The trouble with me is, I like it when somebody digresses. It's more interesting and all.
    J.D. Salinger  --  The Catcher in the Rye
  • digresses = wanders off topic while talking
  • I think that the digression of my thoughts must have done me good, for when I got back to bed I found a lethargy creeping over me.
    Bram Stoker  --  Dracula
  • digression = wandering off topic
  • To return from this digression.
    Jonathan Swift  --  Gulliver's Travels
  • digression = a wandering from a direct or straight course — especially verbally
  • When the demon digressed into observations about his chef's latest dishes, Max broke in.
    Henry H. Neff  --  The Fiend And The Forge
  • digressed = wandered off topic
  • But I am again digressing.
    Frederick Douglass  --  The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
  • digressing = wandering from a direct or straight course — especially verbally
  • But this is mere digression from my purpose.
    William Shakespeare  --  Henry IV, Part 2
  • digression = straying (wandering from a direct or straight course)
  •   Thy noble shape is but a form of wax,
      Digressing from the valor of a man;
    William Shakespeare  --  Romeo and Juliet
  • digressing = deviating (different)
  • Lou felt that they were wandering from the point, and that in digression Alexandra might unnerve him.
    Willa Cather  --  O Pioneers!
  • digression = wandering of topic
  • I am come to keep my word, though in some part enforced to digress
    William Shakespeare  --  The Taming of the Shrew
  • digress = wander from a direct or straight course — especially verbally
  • Is it perfume from a dress
    That makes me so digress?
    T.S. Eliot  --  The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock
  • digress = wander off topic
  • All these digressions, they just screw up your story's sound.
    Tim O'Brien  --  The Things They Carried
  • digressions = wanderings from a direct or straight course
  • After this long digression we have now arrived once more at the point where Pudd'nhead Wilson, while waiting for the arrival of the twins...
    Mark Twain  --  Pudd'nhead Wilson
  • digression = a wandering from a direct or straight course — especially verbally
  • One of them ... informed me with ...  and many digressions ... that my steamer was at the bottom of the river.
    Joseph Conrad  --  Heart of Darkness
  • digressions = wanderings off the main topic
  • Keep your boat-crew leaders and your class leaders informed of any digression from the normal.
    Marcus Luttrell  --  Lone Survivor
  • digression = change (wandering)
  • Chairman said that there had been many irrelevancies yesterday and matters discussed best left undiscussed—and that he would permit no digressions today.
    Robert A. Heinlein  --  The Moon is a Harsh Mistress
  • digressions = wandering off topic
  • By my rambling digressions I perceive myself to be grown old. I us'd to write more methodically.
    Benjamin Franklin  --  The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
digressions = wanderings from a direct or straight course — especially verbally

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