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digress

used in a sentence
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Definition wander from a direct or straight course — typically verbally
  • She always digresses when telling a story.
digresses = wanders from a direct course
  • She likes it when they stick to the numbers and don't digress into storytelling.
  • digress = wander from a direct course
  • You do not immortalize the lost by writing about them. Language buries, but does not resurrect. (Full disclosure: I am not the first to make this observation...) I digress, but here's the rub: The dead are visible only in the terrible lidless eye of memory. The living, thank heaven, retain the ability to surprise and to disappoint.
    John Green  --  The Fault in Our Stars
  • digress = wander from the main topic
  • "All this is a digression," he added in a different tone.
    George Orwell  --  1984
  • digression = not about the main topic
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • Before he came to the heart of his intentions, Dr. Urbino Daza made several digressions on the subject of aging.
    Gabriel Garcia Marquez  --  Love in the Time of Cholera
  • digressions = wanderings from the main topic
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in discussions from discuss, explosions from explode, and revisions from revise.)
  • The trouble with me is, I like it when somebody digresses. It's more interesting and all.
    J.D. Salinger  --  The Catcher in the Rye
  • digresses = wanders off topic
  • And, to digress for a moment, ...
    Sinclair Lewis  --  Main Street
  • digress = wander from the main topic
  • And now, Winslow, we have digressed enough.
    Ouida Sebestyen  --  Words by Heart
  • digressed = wandered away from the main topic
  • I think that the digression of my thoughts must have done me good, for when I got back to bed I found a lethargy creeping over me.
    Bram Stoker  --  Dracula
  • digression = wandering off topic
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • To return from this digression.
    Jonathan Swift  --  Gulliver's Travels
  • digression = instance of getting off the main topic
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • When the demon digressed into observations about his chef's latest dishes, Max broke in.
    Henry H. Neff  --  The Fiend And The Forge
  • digressed = wandered off topic
  • I'm so eager to begin that I'm almost reluctant to digress now to your problem, but I'm afraid I must.
    Joseph Heller  --  Catch-22
  • digress = wander from the main topic
  • But I am again digressing.
    Frederick Douglass  --  The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
  • digressing = wandering away from the main topic
  • But this is mere digression from my purpose.
    William Shakespeare  --  Henry IV, Part 2
  • digression = wandering from a direct or straight course
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • I have too long digressed, and therefore shall return to my subject.
    Jonathan Swift  --  A Modest Proposal
  • digressed = wandered away from the main topic
  • Lou felt that they were wandering from the point, and that in digression Alexandra might unnerve him.
    Willa Cather  --  O Pioneers!
  • digression = wandering of topic
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • I am come to keep my word, though in some part enforced to digress
    William Shakespeare  --  The Taming of the Shrew
  • digress = wander from the main topic
  • Is it perfume from a dress
    That makes me so digress?
    T.S. Eliot  --  The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock
  • digress = wander off topic
  • All these digressions, they just screw up your story's sound.
    Tim O'Brien  --  The Things They Carried
  • digressions = wanderings from the main storyline
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in discussions from discuss, explosions from explode, and revisions from revise.)
  • That remark is a sort of digression.
    Thomas Hardy  --  Far from the Madding Crowd
digression = getting off topic
(editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)

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