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desolate

used in a sentence
3 meanings
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1  —as in:
felt desolate
Definition sad or miserable—and often lonely
  • I heard a low desolate wail.
desolate = very sad
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • She felt desolate when her boyfriend died in a car accident.
  • desolate = very sad and alone
  • It's just a very lonely, helpless feeling at first—a kind of desolate feeling.
    John Steinbeck  --  Travels with Charley
  • desolate = sad or miserable—and often lonely
  • It was no easy thing for him to abandon Adam to his desolation.
    John Steinbeck  --  East of Eden
  • desolation = a feeling of extreme sadness or misery—often with loneliness
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • ...each leaves the passionate lover, or the no less passionate hater, forlorn and desolate by the withdrawal of his subject.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  The Scarlet Letter
  • desolate = miserable and lonely
  • Know that, one by one, my friends were snatched away; I was left desolate.
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
  • desolate = miserable (sad and lonely)
  • Once again I had the desolating sense of having all along ignored what was finest in him.
    John Knowles  --  A Separate Peace
  • desolating = sad or miserable
  • I had never seen him look more desolately alone, and for a fleeting second I felt almost sorry for him.
    Mildred D. Taylor  --  Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry
  • desolately = in a manner that is extremely sad or miserable
  • In complete desolation, I looked at the world above.
    Markus Zusak  --  The Book Thief
  • desolation = misery
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • And in a lower tone to Fanny, "I shall have only a desolate house to hurry from."
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
desolate = sad and lonely

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —as in:
a desolate place
Definition empty, providing no shelter or sustenance
  • The photos show the desolate surface of the moon.
desolate = empty, providing no shelter or sustenance
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • It is in her book of desolate desert photographs.
  • desolate = empty, providing no shelter or sustenance
  • The land was barren and desolate.
    Louis Sachar  --  Holes
  • desolate = empty, providing no shelter, water, or food
  • all the land was desolate and empty.
    J.R.R. Tolkien  --  The Hobbit
  • desolate = empty, providing no shelter or sustenance
  • Before them lay a desolate, rocky plain:
    C.S. Lewis  --  The Silver Chair
  • desolate = empty, providing no shelter or sustenance
  • Such a place the Fallen Angels might have built as a spite to Heaven, dry and sharp, desolate and dangerous, and for me filled with foreboding.
    John Steinbeck  --  Travels with Charley
  • desolate = empty, providing no shelter or sustenance
  • It was quiet and desolate, except for the goat still tied to the tree, bleating for freedom.
    Pam Munoz Ryan  --  Esperanza Rising
  • desolate = empty of life
  • How even as Prometheus took up the flame for mankind, he would have known he was walking towards the eagle and that desolate, eternal crag.
    Madeline Miller  --  Circe
  • desolate = miserable, lonely, and providing no comfort
  • The more desolate and isolated a place was, the better Mom and Dad liked it.
    Jeannette Walls  --  The Glass Castle
  • desolate = empty or miserable
  • These days most of the lots remain vacant and are gradually being reclaimed by the desert. Tumbleweeds scuttle down Salton City's broad, desolate boulevards.
    Jon Krakauer  --  Into the Wild
desolate = empty

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
3  —as in:
desolated the region
Definition destroyed; or emptied of people; or emptied of most plants and animals
  • Fires desolated the region.
desolated = destroyed and emptied it of living things
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • The armies fought over the region for years and desolated it in the process.
  • desolated = destroyed
  • The Martians, I thought, had gone on and left the country desolated, seeking food elsewhere.
    H.G. Wells  --  The War of the Worlds
  • desolated = destroyed or emptied
  • It is well that you come here to whine over the desolation that you have made.
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
  • desolation = destruction
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Though the desolation had not yet arrived, [it] was still in the air, it was certain as man could make it.
    Ray Bradbury  --  Fahrenheit 451
  • desolation = destruction
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • The band of egwugwu moved like a furious whirlwind to Enoch's compound and with machete and fire reduced it to a desolate heap.
    Chinua Achebe  --  Things Fall Apart
  • desolate = destroyed
  • Gashes the size of football fields would appear at the mountain base, leaving a desolation of broken roots and upturned trees where once there had been a forest.
    Tara Westover  --  Educated
  • desolation = destroyed place
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • ...works of death, desolation and tyranny,
    Thomas Jefferson et al.  --  The Declaration of Independence
  • desolation = destruction
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • But below the tops the grass was dry, and the hills of Ndotsheni were red and bare, and the farmers on the tops had begun to fear that the desolation of them would eat back, year by year, mile by mile, until they too were overtaken.
    Alan Paton  --  Cry, the Beloved Country
  • desolation = destruction
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • The cold is excessive, and many of my unfortunate comrades have already found a grave amidst this scene of desolation.
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
desolation = destruction
(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
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