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desolate
used in a sentence

3 meanings
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1  —as in:
felt desolate
Definition sad or miserable—and often lonely
  • I heard a low desolate wail.
desolate = very sad
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • She felt desolate when her boyfriend died in a car accident.
  • desolate = very sad and alone
  • It's just a very lonely, helpless feeling at first—a kind of desolate feeling.
    John Steinbeck  --  Travels with Charley
  • desolate = sad or miserable—and often lonely
  • It was no easy thing for him to abandon Adam to his desolation.
    John Steinbeck  --  East of Eden
  • desolation = a feeling of extreme sadness or misery—often with loneliness
  • Once again I had the desolating sense of having all along ignored what was finest in him.
    John Knowles  --  A Separate Peace
  • desolating = sad or miserable
  • In complete desolation, I looked at the world above.
    Markus Zusak  --  The Book Thief
  • desolation = misery
  • But there were very few people there, and it was sad-looking and desolate to see so many empty chairs.
    Bram Stoker  --  Dracula
  • desolate = miserable (sad and lonely)
  • Hearing this, [that Charlotte was about to die] Wilbur threw himself down in an agony of pain and sorrow. Great sobs racked his body. He heaved and grunted with desolation.
    E. B. White  --  Charlotte's Web
  • desolation = extreme sadness and thoughts of loneliness
  • About half way between West Egg and New York the motor road hastily joins the railroad and runs beside it for a quarter of a mile, so as to shrink away from a certain desolate area of land. This is a valley of ashes...
    F. Scott Fitzgerald  --  The Great Gatsby
  • desolate = miserable (and providing no support for life)
  • the sound of her low voice seemed to have the accompaniment of all the other sounds, full of mystery, desolation, and sorrow, I had ever heard
    Joseph Conrad  --  Heart of Darkness
desolation = extreme sorrow and loneliness

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —as in:
a desolate place
Definition empty, providing no shelter or sustenance
  • The photos show the desolate surface of the moon.
desolate = empty, providing no shelter or sustenance
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • It is in her book of desolate desert photographs.
  • desolate = empty, providing no shelter or sustenance
  • The land was barren and desolate.
    Louis Sachar  --  Holes
  • desolate = empty, providing no shelter or sustenance
  • all the land was desolate and empty.
    J.R.R. Tolkien  --  The Hobbit
  • desolate = empty, providing no shelter or sustenance
  • Before them lay a desolate, rocky plain:
    C.S. Lewis  --  The Silver Chair
  • desolate = empty, providing no shelter or sustenance
  • Such a place the Fallen Angels might have built as a spite to Heaven, dry and sharp, desolate and dangerous, and for me filled with foreboding.
    John Steinbeck  --  Travels with Charley
  • desolate = empty, providing no shelter or sustenance
  • These days most of the lots remain vacant and are gradually being reclaimed by the desert. Tumbleweeds scuttle down Salton City's broad, desolate boulevards.
    Jon Krakauer  --  Into the Wild
  • desolate = empty
  • We had to take some of our provisions too, for we were in a perfect desolation, and so far as we could see through the snowfall, there was not even the sign of habitation.
    Bram Stoker  --  Dracula
  • desolation = a place lacking that which would support life
  • For this seed one or two desolate places have been chosen, but the young demonstrator shakes his head over them, there is so little food in the soil.
    Alan Paton  --  Cry, the Beloved Country
  • desolate = barren (providing no sustenance)
  • The dead grass thrashed softly. Out there a gray desolation.
    Cormac McCarthy  --  The Road
desolation = a state of emptiness that provides no shelter or sustenance

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
3  —as in:
desolated the region
Definition destroyed; or emptied of people; or emptied of most plants and animals
  • Fires desolated the region.
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • The armies fought over the region for years and desolated it in the process.
  • The Martians, I thought, had gone on and left the country desolated, seeking food elsewhere.
    H.G. Wells  --  The War of the Worlds
  • desolated = destroyed or emptied
  • ...works of death, desolation and tyranny,
    Thomas Jefferson et al.  --  The Declaration of Independence
  • desolation = destruction
  • But below the tops the grass was dry, and the hills of Ndotsheni were red and bare, and the farmers on the tops had begun to fear that the desolation of them would eat back, year by year, mile by mile, until they too were overtaken.
    Alan Paton  --  Cry, the Beloved Country
  • desolation = destruction
  • Though the desolation had not yet arrived, was still in the air, it was certain as man could make it.
    Ray Bradbury  --  Fahrenheit 451
  • It filled me with indescribable terror to think how swiftly that desolating change had come.
    H.G. Wells  --  The War of the Worlds
  • And shining with the growing light of the east, three of the metallic giants stood about the pit, their cowls rotating as though they were surveying the desolation they had made.
    H.G. Wells  --  The War of the Worlds
  • As the water spread the weed followed them, until the ruined villas of the Thames valley were for a time lost in this red swamp, whose margin I explored, and much of the desolation the Martians had caused was concealed.
    H.G. Wells  --  The War of the Worlds
  • And through the charred and desolated area—perhaps twenty square miles altogether—that encircled the Martian encampment on Horsell Common, through charred and ruined villages among the green trees, through the blackened and smoking arcades that had been but a day ago pine spinneys, crawled the devoted scouts with the heliographs that were presently to warn the gunners of the Martian approach.
    H.G. Wells  --  The War of the Worlds

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
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