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deride

used in a sentence
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Definition to criticize with strong disrespect — often
with humor
  • She relentlessly mocks and derides the younger students.
derides = criticizes with strong disrespect
  • Every president is subject to much derision on the late-night talk shows.
  • derision = critical disrespect that is humorous
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • She derides heterosexuals as breeders.
  • derides = makes fun of
  • She derided him as hormone-ravaged.
  • derided = made fun of
  • When she spoke of cost-effectiveness, he derided her as a climate denier.
  • derided = criticized with strong disrespect
  • When she spoke of fairness, he derided her as a bleeding heart liberal.
  • derided = criticized with strong disrespect
  • The famous "holy club" was formed by John's younger brother, Charles Wesley, and some fellow students, derisively called "Methodists" because of their methodical habits.
    John Wesley - Wikipedia  --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wesley (retrieved 05/20/06)
  • they admire the clarity of his wit, the fine edge of insult and derision.
    Don DeLillo  --  Underworld
  • derision = treatment of others (or possibly things) as inferior and unworthy of respect
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • Hermione laughed derisively.
    J.K. Rowling  --  Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
  • derisively = mockingly (treating as inferior while making fun of)
  • Putting all the derision he could into his voice, he jeered, "How did you like being shot?"
    Christopher Paolini  --  Eragon
  • derision = critical disrespect — typically while laughing at or making fun of
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  •   The singing words mocked him derisively.
      "How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world ..."
    Aldous Huxley  --  Brave New World
  • derisively = in a manner that showed no respect for his feelings or ideas
  • Piggy once more was the center of social derision...
    William Golding  --  Lord of the Flies
  • derision = ridicule (made fun of and treated as inferior and unworthy of respect)
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • Through the open door came the thuds and occasional clangs of a horseshoe game, and now and then the sound of voices raised in approval or derision.
    John Steinbeck  --  Of Mice and Men
  • derision = making fun of someone's error or lack of skill
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • He storms and bullies and derides; but she stands up to him so ruthlessly that the Colonel has to ask her from time to time to be kinder to Higgins;
    George Bernard Shaw  --  Pygmalion
  • derides = treats as inferior and unworthy of respect
  • His smile faded, and he made a derisive laugh.
    Henry H. Neff  --  The Fiend And The Forge
  • derisive = contemptuous (treating as inferior and unworthy of respect)
  • Lindy's tone is derisive as she passes back copies of the Tuttle homecoming court ballot.
    Alex Flinn  --  Beastly
  • derisive = contemptuous (treating others as inferior and unworthy of respect)
  • Under this derision Babbitt became more matter-of-fact.
    Sinclair Lewis  --  Babbitt
  • derision = critical disrespect — typically while laughing at or making fun of
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • That's such a trite expression,' said the analyst with a derisive laugh.
    Robert Ludlum  --  The Bourne Supremacy
  • derisive = disrespectful (treat as inferior and unworthy of respect)
  • My father snorted in derision.
    Rick Riordan  --  The Titan's Curse
  • derision = treatment of others as inferior and unworthy of respect
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • smiling not in derision but in genuine amusement and kindness.
    Margaret Mitchell  --  Gone with the Wind
derision = critical disrespect — typically while laughing at or making fun of
(editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)

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