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deplore

used in a sentence
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Definition strongly dislike or regret
  • We deplore the government's treatment of political prisoners.
deplore = strongly disapprove of or regret
  • I deplore this hostile action
  • Yet you shall not deplore having known blindness, nor regret having been deaf.
    Kahlil Gibran  --  The Prophet
  • deplore = strongly regret
  • as evil as the Deplorable Word
    C.S. Lewis  --  The Magician's Nephew
  • deplorable = strongly disapproved of
    (Editor's note:  The suffix "-able" means able to be. This is the same pattern you see in words like breakable, understandable, and comfortable.)
  • The deplorable part of it was that Lazarus followed him.
    Richard Connell  --  The Most Dangerous Game
  • deplorable = very bad or regrettable
    (Editor's note:  The suffix "-able" means able to be. This is the same pattern you see in words like breakable, understandable, and comfortable.)
  • And his deplorable habit of being bold after the event, and full, in absence, of the most extraordinary presence of mind.
    Aldous Huxley  --  Brave New World
  • deplorable = very bad or regrettable
    (Editor's note:  The suffix "-able" means able to be. This is the same pattern you see in words like breakable, understandable, and comfortable.)
  • It is deplorable ignorance of his character, child, and nothing else, which makes that dream enter your head.
    Emily Bronte  --  Wuthering Heights
  • deplorable = very bad or regrettable
    (Editor's note:  The suffix "-able" means able to be. This is the same pattern you see in words like breakable, understandable, and comfortable.)
  • The hall was at present occupied by two deplorably sober men and their highly indignant wives.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald  --  The Great Gatsby
  • deplorably = regrettably
    (Editor's note:  The suffix "-ably" is a combination of the suffixes "-able" and "-ly". It means in a manner that is capable of being. This is the same pattern you see in words like agreeably, favorably, and comfortably.)
  • Its deplorable peculiarity was, that it was the faintness of solitude and disuse.
    Charles Dickens  --  A Tale of Two Cities
  • deplorable = very bad or regrettable
    (Editor's note:  The suffix "-able" means able to be. This is the same pattern you see in words like breakable, understandable, and comfortable.)
  • He bitterly deplored the false pride which led his friend to a conduct so little worthy of the affection that united them.
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
  • deplored = disliked
  • You deplore the demonstrations taking place in Birmingham.
    Martin Luther King, Jr.  --  Letter from a Birmingham Jail
  • deplore = strongly disapprove of
  • She thanked him in the most ardent terms for his intended services towards her parent, and at the same time she gently deplored her own fate.
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
  • deplored = disliked or regretted
  • Let me carry through the rest of my misdirected life, the remembrance that I opened my heart to you, last of all the world; and that there was something left in me at this time which you could deplore and pity.
    Charles Dickens  --  A Tale of Two Cities
  • deplore = strongly dislike
  • Bitterly did he deplore a deficiency which now he could scarcely comprehend to have been possible.
    Austen, Jane  --  Mansfield Park
  • At the same time, one must deplore the ramification of organizations, Mrs.
    Woolf, Virginia  --  Night and Day
  • The physician shook his head, leaving it doubtful whether he meant to reply in the negative or to deplore considerations of that nature.
    Shaw, George Bernard  --  An Unsocial Socialist
  • "Oh," cried Eugenie, "you are a bad physiognomist, if you imagine I deplore on my own account the catastrophe of which you warn me."
    Dumas, Alexandre  --  The Count of Monte Cristo
  • Don't be too ready to deplore my sad condition, sir
    Collins, Wilkie  --  The Two Destinies
  • It's the contemplation of this sort of thing, that makes me deplore my fate in being a bachelor.
    Dickens, Charles  --  The Old Curiosity Shop
  • The more I consider this mighty tail, the more do I deplore my inability to express it.
    Melville, Herman  --  Moby Dick LXVIII-CXXXIV

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