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vocabulary
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delude

used in a sentence
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Definition deceive (convince to have a false belief)
  • She is a sincere but deluded idealist.
deluded = with a false belief
  • She has delusions of grandeur.
  • delusions = false beliefs
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in discussions from discuss, explosions from explode, and revisions from revise.)
  • Don't delude yourself. You're drinking too much.
  • delude = deceive (convince of a false belief)
  • as long as I was truly insane now, I might as well enjoy the delusions while they were pleasant.
    Stephenie Meyer  --  New Moon
  • delusions = false beliefs
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in discussions from discuss, explosions from explode, and revisions from revise.)
  • If the poor soul is that delusional, he's even sicker than I thought.
    Steve Lopez  --  The Soloist
  • delusional = out of touch with reality (having false beliefs)
  • The woman is delusional.
    Simone Elkeles  --  Perfect Chemistry
  • delusional = out of touch with reality (having false beliefs)
  • The ability to delude yourself may be an important survival tool.
    Jane Wagner
  • The world is not respectable; it is mortal, tormented, confused, deluded forever; but it is shot through with beauty, with love, with glints of courage and laughter; and in these, the spirit blooms timidly, and struggles to the light amid the thorns.
    George Santayana
  • Or would she go a step further, and delude us into believing that the Moonstone was stolen?
    Collins, Wilkie  --  The Moonstone
  • You delude me with a false assent, and then I am at the mercy of your devices.
    Eliot, George  --  Middlemarch
  • Are you any less deluded?
    Rick Riordan  --  The Sea of Monsters
  • There are many deceptions and delusions in nature that serve a purpose.
    Anton Chekhov  --  Home
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-sions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in discussions from discuss, explosions from explode, and revisions from revise.)
  • He had been forged, by that deluded old teacher, into a sort of Pasteur or Curie or patient discoverer of insulin.
    T. H. White  --  The Once and Future King
  • First the delusions start, then animal instincts begin to overpower the human ones.
    James Dashner  --  The Maze Runner
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-sions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in discussions from discuss, explosions from explode, and revisions from revise.)
  • Do you understand now, deluded ones?
    J.K. Rowling  --  Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
  • I pity this man's deluded and diseased mind.
    Richard Wright  --  Native Son
  • I thought it at the best an amiable delusion.
    Henry James  --  The American
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings, as something separated from the rest—a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness.
    Neal Shusterman  --  Unwind
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • Self-deluding heroics always get in the way and screw things up.
    Robert Ludlum  --  The Bourne Supremacy
  • A curious delusion—as if adding zeros could produce a sum.
    Robert A. Heinlein  --  Glory Road
(editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)

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