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credulous
used in a sentence

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Definition gullible (being too willing to believe)
  • The trick would fool none but the most credulous.
credulous = gullible (being too willing to believe)
  • She is so credulous she believes everything she reads.
  • credulous = gullible (being too willing to believe)
  • Man is a credulous animal, and must believe something; in the absence of good grounds for belief, he will be satisfied with bad ones.
    Bertrand Russell
  • So I fear that your Dr. Jordan is either credulous to an infantile degree, or himself a great scoundrel;
    Margaret Atwood  --  Alias Grace
  • credulous = gullible (being too willing to believe)
  • It was a bit more than credulity could bear
    J.D. Robb  --  Immortal in Death
  • credulity = willingness to believe
  • Grandmother tried to cheer us with hopeful words, and they found an echo in the credulous hearts of youth.
    Harriet Jacobs  --  Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
  • credulous = trusting (willing to believe)
  • Antonia had the most trusting, responsive eyes in the world; love and credulousness seemed to look out of them with open faces.
    Willa Cather  --  My Antonia
  • credulousness = trust (readiness to believe)
  • Even the humblest Party member is expected to be competent, industrious, and even intelligent within narrow limits, but it is also necessary that he should be a credulous and ignorant fanatic whose...
    George Orwell  --  1984
  • credulous = more willing to believe than is logical
  • his credulous disciples believed that he had specifically fore-announced it, instead of only making a general prophecy
    Herman Melville  --  Moby Dick
  • credulous = too willing to believe
  • Indeed, madame, you believe me too credulous!
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Three Musketeers
  • credulous = gullible (being too willing to believe)
  • Oh, in such cases the criminal is often amazingly shallow and credulous.
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky  --  The Brothers Karamazov
  • credulous = gullible (being too willing to believe)
  • A man is never more credulous than in receiving favourable opinions on the beauty of a woman he is half, or quite, in love with;
    Thomas Hardy  --  Far from the Madding Crowd
  • credulous = willing to believe
  • But McWatt winked at him reassuringly as he climbed down from the plane and joshed hospitably with the credulous new pilot and bombardier during the jeep ride back to the squadron,
    Joseph Heller  --  Catch-22
  • credulous = gullible (being too willing to believe)
  • As our credulity switched back to her she leaned forward with enthusiasm.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald  --  The Great Gatsby
  • credulity = interest and willingness to believe
  • Seek no mercy from me, sir, in behalf of the fellow who has imposed upon your childish credulity, but let him expect the worst that I can do.
    Charles Dickens  --  Nicholas Nickleby
  • credulity = gullibility (being too willing to believe)
  • His voice alone inspires one with absolute credulity.
    Oscar Wilde  --  The Importance of Being Earnest
  • credulity = willingness to believe
  • modest wisdom plucks me from over-credulous haste:
    William Shakespeare  --  Macbeth
  • credulous = gullible (being too willing to believe)
  • If he be credulous and trust my tale,
    William Shakespeare  --  The Taming of the Shrew
  • credulous = too willing to believe
  • For she is credulous and good-hearted, and she believes everything from the goodness of her heart and...
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky  --  Crime and Punishment
  • credulous = gullible (too willing to believe)
  • Thus credulous fools are caught;
    William Shakespeare  --  Othello, the Moor of Venice
credulous = too willing to believe

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